The World Confederation of Labour or WCL is an international trade union confederation of 144 trades unions from 116 countries with over 26 million members. Its head office is located in Brussels, Belgium and it is the world's oldest existing international trade union.

It was founded in 1920 at The Hague in the Netherlands as the International Federation of Christian Trade Unions or IFCTU, adopting a statement of principles based on the basic values of Christian humanism. The IFCTU opposed the right-wing totalitarian ideology of Fascism and Nazism and paid the price as its affiliates in Austria, Germany and Italy were banned and many of its leaders persecuted and deported to concentration camps. After World War II the victorious allies convened a conference held at Paris, in October 1945 where the World Federation of Trade Unions was formed, the IFCTU declined an invitation to join and preferred to remain independent.

In the post war period, Europe was divided between East and West and the IFCTU was unable to promote its brand of Christian unionism in the Communist East. The World Federation of Trade Unions soon divided as well, with the non-communist unions leaving to form the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. The IFCTU again declined to join with the ICFTU, preferring the independence to criticise the "perverse effects both of communism and capitalism".

In 1968 it decided to abandon its specifically Christian ideology with a more ecumenical approach and adopted its new name, the "World Confederation of Labour" and a new Declaration of Principles which calls for

"either a spiritual concept based on the conviction that man and universe are created by God, or other concepts that lead together with it to a common effort to build a human community united in freedom, dignity, justice and brotherhood".

Information drawn from the World Confederation of Labour website at; unfortunately the page relating to member organisation is broken but the following are affiliates;