1497-1560

Philip Melanchthon was a key figure with then Lutheran reformation. He was one of the leaders of the Lutheran reformation and after Martin Luther’s death in 1546 he became the leading Lutheran theologist.

Melanchthon was a moderate and was extremely good at understanding the political necessity of compromise. This meant he often represented Lutherans at Diets or Colloquys. He, in conjunction with other theologians, drew up the Augsburg Confession in 1530 at the Diet of Augsburg. Melanchthon also played a key role in the attempt at settlement at the Diet of Regensburg, 1541.

While Melanchthon was the leading moderate of the Lutheran cause he never came to prominence, most likely due to the fact that, despite his best attempts, no compromise was agreed with Charles V and the Roman Catholic Church.