During his Northwest coastal explorations, Captain George Vancouver became the first European to identify the area near Whidbey Island as a passage, which he named "Deception Pass." A 1925 act of Congress designated the property for public recreation purposes. In the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps(CCC) built roads, trails, buildings and bridges to develop the park.

The name "Deception Pass" derived from Captain Vancouver's realization that what he had mistaken for a peninsula was actually an island. He named that island "Whidbey" in honor of his assistant, Joseph Whidbey, who was at his side when Vancouver realized the mistake. The captain named the inlet at which he was anchored "Deception Pass" to commemorate the error.

Deception Pass State Park is a 4,134-acre marine and camping park with 77,000 feet of saltwater shoreline, and 33,900 feet of freshwater shoreline on four lakes. Rugged cliffs drop to meet the turbulent waters of Deception Pass. The park is outstanding for breath-taking views, old-growth forests and abundant wildlife.

Summer: 6:30 a.m. to dusk. Winter: 8 a.m. to dusk (November 1 to March 31). The park is open year-round for camping and day use.

Camping: Check-in time, 2:30 p.m. Check-out time, 1 p.m. Quiet hours: 11 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

Located ten miles north of Oak Harbor, WA on Whidbey Island in Puget Sound.

From Seattle: Drive north on I-5 to exit 230, then travel 18 miles west on SR 20 toward Oak Harbor. Park entrance is on right, one mile south of Deception Pass Bridge.

From the Mukilteo-Clinton Ferry: Drive north on Hwy. 525, which changes to Hwy. 20. Drive 50 miles to park entrance on left.

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