The Triumph TR6 is a two-seat sports car in the classic sense. It was built in Coventry, England by the Standard-Triumph Motor Company between the years of 1969 and 1976. Over 95,000 were produced, the vast majority for export to the United States, making the TR6 Triumph's most successful car.

Body and Styling

The body lines of the TR6 are fairly straight and classic. The exterior styling was done by Karmann, building off the successful looks of the TR4 and TR250/TR5. All TR6's have essentially identical body styling. The differences that crept in over the years are minor; post 1973 1/2, all cars exported to the United States have large, ugly black rubber-coated front bumper overriders (called 'tits' by aficionados) which were placed there to satisfy U.S. DOT import regulations regarding bumper height. As a result, the turn signals (heretofore just above the bumper) moved below it. Sometime around 1972, the air intake scuttle went from a moveable plate to a grille. That's really about it.


The TR6 is powered by a 2500cc steel head straight six motor. It is a short-stroke 'dry' engine, and is remarkably simple and durable. The Triumph 2500cc was used to power a number of cars, including the famed TVR sportscars. As shipped to the U.S. until 1974, it develops 112 BHP (or thereabouts) and redlines at 5,000 RPM. After 1974, the engine was detuned slightly, developing 106 HP, for emissions purposes. The California model contained an air pump and other smog-related paraphernalia that stole power. Those cars built for the home market (Britain) had, however, a higher-performance cam and Lucas Fuel Injection, making them one of the first sports cars sold with this technology. They developed over 150HP. The PI (Petrol Injection) system wasn't shipped to the U.S. due to emissions again.

Places to find info on the TR6

There's an excellent website at which is the home of the SOL, or Scions of Lucas, an internet Triumph club. One might also try the estimable Google. For an excellent brief introduction to the TR6 with classic dry British humor, look on youtube for 'Top Gear TR6' for a bit with James May.

These cars are wonderful for the beginning collector/tinkerer/restorer. Due to their long production run, parts are still readily available, with many being manufactured today by British Motor Heritage Industry Trust certified resellers. They are cheap, as well, with even excellent examples to be had for under $15K. They are simple, with no electronics, basic electrics and a lot of room under the bonnet to work. Most of all, they're pure unadulturated fun to drive - with the right exhaust note booming, wind blowing, and of course your electrics acting balky, they harken back to the glory days of motoring both in Britain and in the U.S. Those days have been mostly swallowed by hermetically-sealed cars, electronics, superhighways and the like, but can always be revived on a two-lane country road by the blare of a British convertible headed by with no destination in mind but the joy of the curves.