This term apparently describes an odd sounding manoeuvre performed by geese (which would also seem appropriate for a Jabberwock).

When coming in to land, in order to lose height quickly, they tip sideways sometimes flipping over completely.

This I have to see!

See also whiffle.

http://www.travelmanitoba.com/adventure/wildlife/birds.html
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1551/3357159.html

Whif"fle (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Whiffled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Whiffling (?).] [Freq. of whiff to puff, perhaps influenced by D. weifelen to waver.]

1.

To waver, or shake, as if moved by gusts of wind; to shift, turn, or veer about.

Dmpier.

2.

To change from one opinion or course to another; to use evasions; to prevaricate; to be fickle.

<-- to waffle; vacillate, equivocate, flip-flop. -->

A person of whiffing and unsteady turn of mind can not keep close to a point of controversy. I. Watts.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whif"fle, v. t.

1.

To disperse with, or as with, a whiff, or puff; to scatter.

[Obs.]

Dr. H. More.

2.

To wave or shake quickly; to cause to whiffle.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whif"fle, n.

A fife or small flute.

[Obs.]

Douce.

 

© Webster 1913.

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