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    76.

    1. Man at his birth is supple and weak; at his death, firm and strong. (So it is with) all things. Trees and plants, in their early growth, are soft and brittle; at their death, dry and withered.

    2. Thus it is that firmness and strength are the concomitants of death; softness and weakness, the concomitants of life.

    3. Hence he who (relies on) the strength of his forces does not conquer; and a tree which is strong will fill the out-stretched arms, (and thereby invites the feller.)

    4. Therefore the place of what is firm and strong is below, and that of what is soft and weak is above.

    77.

    1. May not the Way (or Tao) of Heaven be compared to the (method of) bending a bow? The (part of the bow) which was high is brought low, and what was low is raised up. (So Heaven) diminishes where there is superabundance, and supplements where there is deficiency.

    2. It is the Way of Heaven to diminish superabundance, and to supplement deficiency. It is not so with the way of man. He takes away from those who have not enough to add to his own superabundance.

    3. Who can take his own superabundance and therewith serve all under heaven? Only he who is in possession of the Tao!

    4. Therefore the (ruling) sage acts without claiming the results as his; he achieves his merit and does not rest (arrogantly) in it:--he does not wish to display his superiority.

    78.

    1. There is nothing in the world more soft and weak than water, and yet for attacking things that are firm and strong there is nothing that can take precedence of it;--for there is nothing (so effectual) for which it can be changed.

    2. Every one in the world knows that the soft overcomes the hard, and the weak the strong, but no one is able to carry it out in practice.

    3. Therefore a sage has said,
    'He who accepts his state's reproach,
    Is hailed therefore its altars' lord;
    To him who bears men's direful woes
    They all the name of King accord.'

    4. Words that are strictly true seem to be paradoxical.

    79.

    1. When a reconciliation is effected (between two parties) after a great animosity, there is sure to be a grudge remaining (in the mind of the one who was wrong). And how can this be beneficial (to the other)?

    2. Therefore (to guard against this), the sage keeps the left-hand portion of the record of the engagement, and does not insist on the (speedy) fulfillment of it by the other party. (So), he who has the attributes (of the Tao) regards (only) the conditions of the engagement, while he who has not those attributes regards only the conditions favourable to himself.

    3. In the Way of Heaven, there is no partiality of love; it is always on the side of the good man.

    80.

    1. In a little state with a small population, I would so order it, that, though there were individuals with the abilities of ten or a hundred men, there should be no employment of them; I would make the people, while looking on death as a grievous thing, yet not remove elsewhere (to avoid it).

    2. Though they had boats and carriages, they should have no occasion to ride in them; though they had buff coats and sharp weapons, they should have no occasion to don or use them.

    3. I would make the people return to the use of knotted cords (instead of the written characters).

    4. They should think their (coarse) food sweet; their (plain) clothes beautiful; their (poor) dwellings places of rest; and their common (simple) ways sources of enjoyment.

    5. There should be a neighbouring state within sight, and the voices of the fowls and dogs should be heard all the way from it to us, but I would make the people to old age, even to death, not have any intercourse with it.

    81.

    1. Sincere words are not fine; fine words are not sincere. Those who are skilled (in the Tao) do not dispute (about it); the disputatious are not skilled in it. Those who know (the Tao) are not extensively learned; the extensively learned do not know it.

    2. The sage does not accumulate (for himself). The more that he expends for others, the more does he possess of his own; the more that he gives to others, the more does he have himself.

    3. With all the sharpness of the Way of Heaven, it injures not; with all the doing in the way of the sage he does not strive.

This etext (the Project Gutenberg Etext of Tao/Dao Te/h King/Ching Hsuan Chiao) was created by Gregory Walker, Austin, Texas. The equipment: a Gateway 2000 486/25, an HP ScanJet Iip flatbed scanner, Calera WordScan 2.0 OCR software, Word for Windows 2.0, and WinEmacs 1.1.1.
In addition, it was reformatted for Everything and nodified by Pseudo_Intellectual, aka Rowan Lipkovits, using two hands and far too much free time.

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