To order a supply of a publication, usually a magazine or newspaper, to arrive whenever a new issue is released.
Also to believe one theory, or doctrine over another.

Sub*scribe" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Subscribed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Subscribing.] [L. subscribere, subscriptum; sub under + scribere to write: cf. F. souscrire. See Scribe.]

1.

To write underneath, as one's name; to sign (one's name) to a document.

[They] subscribed their names under them. Sir T. More.

2.

To sign with one's own hand; to give consent to, as something written, or to bind one's self to the terms of, by writing one's name beneath; as, parties subscribe a covenant or contract; a man subscribes a bond.

All the bishops subscribed the sentence. Milman.

3.

To attest by writing one's name beneath; as, officers subscribe their official acts, and secretaries and clerks subscribe copies or records.

4.

To promise to give, by writing one's name with the amount; as, each man subscribed ten dollars.

5.

To sign away; to yield; to surrender.

[Obs.]

Shak.

6.

To declare over one's signature; to publish.

[Obs.]

Either or must shortly hear from him, or I will subscribe him a coward. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Sub*scribe", v. i.

1.

To sign one's name to a letter or other document.

Shak.

2.

To give consent to something written, by signing one's name; hence, to assent; to agree.

So spake, so wished, much humbled Eve; but Fate Subscribed not. Milton.

3.

To become surely; -- with for.

[R.]

Shak.

4.

To yield; to admit one's self to be inferior or in the wrong.

[Obs.]

I will subscribe, and say I wronged the duke. Shak.

5.

To set one's name to a paper in token of promise to give a certain sum.

6.

To enter one's name for a newspaper, a book, etc.

 

© Webster 1913.

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