Re*lent" (r?-l?nt"), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Relented; p. pr. & vb. n. Relenting.] [F. ralentir, fr. L. pref. re- re- + ad to + lentus pliant, flexible, slow. See Lithe.]

1.

To become less rigid or hard; to yield; to dissolve; to melt; to deliquesce.

[Obs.]

He stirred the coals till relente gan The wax again the fire. Chaucer.

[Salt of tartar] placed in a cellar will . . . begin to relent. Boyle.

When opening buds salute the welcome day, And earth, relenting, feels the genial ray. Pope.

2.

To become less severe or intense; to become less hard, harsh, cruel, or the like; to soften in temper; to become more mild and tender; to feel compassion.

Can you . . . behold My sighs and tears, and will not once relent? Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*lent", v. t.

1.

To slacken; to abate.

[Obs.]

And oftentimes he would relent his pace. Spenser.

2.

To soften; to dissolve.

[Obs.]

3.

To mollify ; to cause to be less harsh or severe.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*lent" (r?-l?nt"), n.

Stay; stop; delay.

[Obs.]

Nor rested till she came without relent Unto the land of Amazona. Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.

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