The most common use of the word poop these days is as a synonym for poo. It can be a noun (syn. with feces) or verb (syn. go potty). It is most often used by small children or dog owners (where it has been given a boost by the phrase "Please scoop your poop!") This most likely derives from Webster's second definition below (to break wind).

A poop is also a stupid, boring, or annoying person. Somewhat related to the term party pooper.

And finally, poop is slang for information or news; the straight poop, poop from the group, get the real poop. In this case, poop is a mild replacement for shit. Probably also related to poop sheet.

Also see pooped.


http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=poop&r=66
http://4mermarine.com/USMC/dictionary.html#pissc
http://www.acronymfinder.com/af-query.asp?Acronym=POOP&String=exact&p=ol (below)

Acronyms: Perl Object-Oriented Persistence; Procedural Object Oriented Programming; Plain Old Orbix Protocol; Perl Object Oriented Programming; Pre-Owned Office Products; Post Object Oriented Programming; Poor Operating on Packet; Pipe Organ Owners and Players; Pooled Out of Process; Pseudo Object Oriented Programming; Propane, Oxygen, Oxygen, Propane (mnemonic for safe order for turning on torch); Process Oriented Observation Program; Persistent Object Oriented Perl; Permanently Out Of Print.

Poop (?), n. Arch.

See 2d Poppy.

 

© Webster 1913.


Poop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Pooped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Pooping.] [Cf. D. poepen. See Pop.]

To make a noise; to pop; also, to break wind.

 

© Webster 1913.


Poop, n. [F. poupe; cf. Sp. & Pg. popa, It. poppa; all fr. L. puppis.] Naut.

A deck raised above the after part of a vessel; the hindmost or after part of a vessel's hull; also, a cabin covered by such a deck. See Poop deck, under Deck. See also Roundhouse.

With wind in poop, the vessel plows the sea. Dryden.

The poop was beaten gold. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Poop, v. t. Naut. (a)

To break over the poop or stern, as a wave.

"A sea which he thought was going to poop her." Lord Dufferin. (b)

To strike in the stern, as by collision.

 

© Webster 1913.

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