On E2, virtually every page is a node and many of the items contained in a page are nodes. That's both technical and vague so here's how it works for the average user: In its most commonly used context, a "node" is a collection of one or more writeups/articles, such as the page you are viewing now. Don't let the title mislead you. This here is a node that happens to bear the title "node" because it talks about nodes. Other systems may call it a "topic" and you should think of it as such if it helps.

If you are just viewing my writeup, without the others below, then you are on the single writeup display page (which, rather confusingly, is a node in its own right) and should click the link all of node, there are X more writeups in this node that you see just above this writeup. You can also adjust how you view E2 by going to your preferences link in your Epicenter nodelet on the right. We highly recommend you choose display type "full" because most people use it and all writeups are displayed.

What you're really viewing when you're looking at a node like this one is a type of node called an "E2node". This is what's generally meant when someone says "node." A single e2node may contain any number of writeups by any number of users. A writeup is what you are reading right now, this is "Virgil's" writeup for the node "node". There are a number of writeups below mine that give different definitions for different contexts of the word "node". If there were a song called "node" its lyrics would most likely be below. If there were a play entitled "node" the play's author and basic plot would most likely be below. You may also come across a node that contains no writeups, in which case we call it a "nodeshell." A nodeshell is still a valid e2node, just one with no content. If you create an e2node, it will be a nodeshell until you post your writeup.

Users will often refer to writeups as nodes or nodes as writeups. This is technically incorrect but you can't fight common usage. For instance, a user would say in the chatterbox "I'm working on a new node" or "Check out my node on reptiles". What the user really means is "Check out my writeup in reptiles". Nobody "owns" a node. It makes little difference if your writeup is first or fifth. After fifth you might want to consider not adding a writeup unless you've really got something new to say.

Besides "E2nodes" there is a "document" node type. A 'document' node is one large page with a single "writeup". A document will not have a particular author assigned to it - only E2 staff can create a document. For examples of different documents check out



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E2 Glossary

Electrically, a node is any continuous section of a circuit sharing the same voltage. Typically this occurs at the junction of different components, but a node is not just the junction.

See also node analysis.

As an extra thought: Since any number of components can be connected to a node, it can used as a method for locating components. If one names each node, and then indicates, for each component, which terminals of the component connect to which nodes, one has an unambiguous mapping of a circuit; this is, for example, the approach that spice uses.

Related to Webster's definition, it may also refer to the intersection or convergence of ley lines or dragon lines (qi forces). At least, if you believe in that sort of thing.

(Hey, never say reading crappy Urban Fantasy is a waste of time: I got a 5 on the Art History AP by blathering about nodes, ley lines and Canterbury Cathedral for pages on end.)
evol
A branching point on a dendrogram, especially on a cladogram or phylogenetic tree.
fault
The point along a fault at which the direction of apparent displacement changes. It can occur, for instance, at the intersection of a lateral fault with a fold.
paleont
(a) The uncalcified proximal extremity of a branch froming an articulation in a jointed colony of cheilostome bryozoans. (b) A knob, protuberance, or thickened or swollen part of an animal, such as a small boss at the end of a foraminiferal pillar.
waves
That point on a standing wave at which the vertical motion is least and the horizontal velocity is greatest. It is also associated with seiches. Ant: antinode



Glossary of Geology, Third Ed. Bates and Jackson. American Geological Institute, 1987.
In regards to hypertext terminology, A node is a unit of information. Sometimes this can also be refered to as a (Hyper or Note) Card, or frame. However it's largely terminology used by people directly involved in hypertext creation and utilization. The common user would more likely refer to it as a document or textfile, though that's not always the case. The word Node is occasionally used to mean network host but this is misleading and improper. Consequently, an anchor is an area inside a given node which equates to the destination of a given link from some other node. Technically, you click on an anchor, which takes you through the link, to get to the node that the anchor was linked to. We say "click on the link" but that's technically misleading. What we see highlighted inside a particular node is actually an anchor which uses the link to get us to the anchored node. If I lost you with all of that, just ignore the whole anchor thing and think of everything as links and nodes. Everybody else does anyway. Why split hairs?

In regards to human physiology, lymph nodes are another term for the glands of the lymphatic system in the body. They are small organs shaped like beans which contain thousands of leukocytes embedded in the tissue. The bloodstream passes through these lymph nodes which filter out toxins from the body. These nodes also produce phagocytes which assist the body's immune system. During infection of a humanoid system, more phagocytes are produced from these nodes, causing them to swell, causing inflamation and sometimes painful discomfort. These can most noticably be detected by physicians in the armpit, on the neck, or near the groin. Sometimes malignancies caused by cancer can reach the lymphatic system, and travel through the body at a disasterous rate.

In a graph, the nodes (aka vertices) are the points which are connected by edges. (combinatorics definition)

--back to combinatorics--
In computer science the concept of a node is used in a number of data structures. Some of these include Graphs, Linked lists, Trees.

In these data structures the node serves as a temporary location that a pointer is pointing to for a program variable to traverse the data structure or access the data within it. A node usually contains a link or links to other nodes in the structure as well as some data.

There are two basic kinds of nodes. There is a parent node, which has links to other nodes and leaf nodes, which do not.

In E2 we try and avoid leaf nodes with hardlinks and softlinks.

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Node
Object

This object represents a single node within the document tree. As such, it provides methods for dealing with the tree hierarchy, including handling child nodes. Be aware that not all objects that inherit from Node actually permit child nodes (e.g. Text nodes). Further, it provides "standard" attributes of nodeName, nodeValue and attributes which may or may not map to the specific object's attributes (e.g. Comment nodes do not have attributes). For details of a particular Node type, see the relevant write up:

  1. Element
  2. Attr
  3. Text
  4. CDATASection *
  5. EntityReference *
  6. Entity *
  7. ProcessingInstruction *
  8. Comment
  9. Document
  10. DocumentType *
  11. DocumentFragment
  12. Notation
* - extended interface present if DOMImplementation.hasFeature("XML", "2.0") is true.

The number against each entry above corresponds to its nodeType value. Values up to 200 are reserved.

attributes
Attribute (read only, NamedNodeMap)

As of DOM2, only Element nodes have attributes.

childNodes
Attribute (read only, NodeList)

The NodeList returned is null if there are no child nodes.

firstChild
Attribute (read only, Node)

Null if there are no child nodes.

lastChild
Attribute (read only, Node)

Null if there are no child nodes.

localName
Attribute (read only, string)

Introduced in DOM Level 2. See namespaceURI.

namespaceURI
Attribute (read only, string)

Introduced in DOM Level 2. Null if there is no namespace specified. The value is the literal value used when the node was created, not resolved in any way. Under DOM2, only Element and Attribute nodes have namespaces and only then when created with the new methods.

nextSibling
Attribute (read only, Node)

The node following this one at the current level of the hierarchy. Null if this is the last node beneath its parent.

nodeName
Attribute (read only, DOMString)

The value of nodeName is dependent upon the nodeType. Individual write ups will indicate the actual value.

nodeType
Attribute (read only, unsigned short)

See above for a list of current node types and their type numbers. The DOM implementation probably provides symbolic constants (e.g. "DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE") for these values - use them.

nodeValue
Attribute (DOMString; can throw DOMException on setting and retrieval)

The content of nodeValue is dependent upon the nodeType. Individual write ups will indicate what is returned.

The exceptions thrown are:

NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only.
DOMSTRING_SIZE_ERR
An attempt was made to exceed the (implementation defined) maximum string length.

ownerDocument
Attribute (read only, Document)

Modified in DOM Level 2. The document object that "owns" this node, i.e. that was used to create it. Note that document nodes and DocumentType nodes that are not in use have null ownerDocuments.

parentNode
Attribute (read only, Node)

This node's "parent" within the hierarchy. Null if the node hasn't been added to or has been removed from the hierarchy. (Always null for Attribute, Document, DocumentFragment, Entity and Notation nodes.) When null, nextSibling and previousSibling are null.

prefix
Attribute (string; can throw DOMException on setting)

Introduced in DOM Level 2. See namespaceURI.

The exceptions thrown are:

INVALID_CHARACTER_ERR
An attempt was made to set a prefix containing an illegal character.
NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only.
NAMESPACE_ERR
The namespace prefix is invalid.

previousSibling
Attribute (read only, Node)

The node preceeding this one at the current level of the hierarchy. Null if this is the first node beneath its parent.

appendChild
Method
ECMAScript binding: appendChild(newChild) (returns Node; newChild is a Node; can raise DOMException)

Functionally equivalent to insertBefore(newChild, null).

The exceptions thrown are:

HIERARCHY_REQUEST_ERR
A circular reference would be created or this node does not permit child nodes of newChild's or its decendents' type.
WRONG_DOCUMENT_ERR
newChild does not belong in this document.
NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only.

cloneNode
Method
ECMAScript binding: cloneNode(deep) (returns Node; deep is boolean)

Returns a copy of this node. The copy's parentNode is null. Child nodes copied are:

  • If this is an Element node, the Attributes are copied.
  • If deep is true, all child nodes are copied.

There are other, subtle effects of cloneNode:

Note that cloning an immutable subtree results in a mutable copy, but the children of an EntityReference clone are readonly. In addition, clones of unspecified Attr nodes are specified.

hasAttributes
Method
ECMAScript binding: hasAttributes() (returns boolean)

Introduced in DOM Level 2. In DOM2, returns false unless this is an Entity node that is parent to one or more Attribute nodes.

hasChildNodes
Method
ECMAScript binding: hasChildNodes() (returns boolean)

Returns false until this node is parent to one or more nodes.

insertBefore
Method
ECMAScript binding: insertBefore(newChild, refChild) (returns Node; newChild and refChild are Nodes; can raise DOMException)

If newChild is already a child of this node, it is removed. If refChild is not null, the insertion point is positioned before it. If null, then the insertion point is after the current last child node. newChild is then added at the insertion point.

If newChild is a DocumentFragment, all the contained nodes are added to this node's children.

The exceptions thrown are:

HIERARCHY_REQUEST_ERR
A circular reference would be created or this node does not permit child nodes of newChild's or its decendents' type.
WRONG_DOCUMENT_ERR
newChild does not belong in this document.
NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only or newChild is read only (we need to set its parentNode!).
NOT_FOUND_ERR
refChild (which is not null) cannot be found as a child of this node.

isSupported
Method
ECMAScript binding: isSupported(feature, version) (returns boolean; feature and version are strings)

Modified in DOM Level 2. Checks whether a feature (assumed to pass the hasFeature check on the DOMImplementation) is supported by this node. The parameters are the same as hasFeature.

normalize
Method
ECMAScript binding: normalize() (no return value)

Merges all logically adjacent Text nodes.

removeChild
Method
ECMAScript binding: removeChild(oldChild) (returns Node; oldChild is a Node; can raise DOMException)

oldChild is removed from this node's children (and returned).

The exceptions thrown are:

NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only or newChild is read only (we need to set its parentNode!).
NOT_FOUND_ERR
refChild (which is not null) cannot be found as a child of this node.

replaceChild
Method
ECMAScript binding: replaceChild(newChild, oldChild) (returns Node; newChild and oldChild are Nodes; can raise DOMException)

If newChild is already a child of this node, it is removed. oldChild is removed (and returned) and newChild is added in its place. If newChild is a DocumentFragment, all the contained nodes are added to this node's children.

The exceptions thrown are:

HIERARCHY_REQUEST_ERR
A circular reference would be created or this node does not permit child nodes of newChild's or its decendents' type.
WRONG_DOCUMENT_ERR
newChild does not belong in this document.
NO_MODIFICATION_ALLOWED_ERR
The node is read only or newChild is read only (we need to set its parentNode!).
NOT_FOUND_ERR
oldChild cannot be found as a child of this node.

In network terminology, a node refers to any addressable host or device on the network. Generally, even devices with multiple addresses (e.g. - routers, servers with multiple NICs, etc.) are referred to as single nodes.

Nodes (or, sometimes, "nodules") are calluses that form on the vocal cords in response to misuse. If you're lucky, they'll go away by themselves. If you're typical, you'll have to have surgery.

When I met my college girlfriend, she had just had node surgery, and was prohibited to speak. We met at the music library, where we worked as desk clerks, helping people find things and checking materials in and out. Because she couldn't speak for those first few weeks, we communicated by leaving notes for each other on the desk blotter.

In plant terminology, a node is the area from which leaves, branches, or roots emerge. Plants are made up of a series of nodes; the areas in between the nodes which consist only of stem are known as internodes. Leafy nodes may consist of one leaf, two leaves, or several leaves. (this is important in identifying the plant.)

In plant propagation, nodes are very important becuase they are the areas where opportunistic roots may form. When a cutting is taken, at least one node must be found in each cutting so the plant can form new roots. (usually at least 2 nodes is better as they are often reluctant to produce leaves and roots from the same node) In other techniques, such as layering, an entire node or series of nodes are buried in dirt or another medium, while the nodes are still connected to the parent plant as well. If things go well, these areas will form new roots, and may be detatched to form a new plant.

The orbit of a satellite about the Earth (or anything else, for that matter) is in the shape of a conic section, with the center of the Earth at one focus of the conic section.1 The orbit, therefore, lies in a single plane in space, which also contains the center point of the Earth.

The Earth's equator also lies in a single plane in space, containing the center point of the Earth.

These two planes, the orbital and and equatorial, intersect in a line passing through the center of the Earth. This line is called the "node" of the orbit.

The node line is often depicted as two vectors, separated by 180 degrees, pointing away from the Earth's center along the node. The ascending node is the vector intersected by the orbit as the satellite moves from south to north. The descending node is the opposite: the vector intersected by the orbit as the satellite moves from north to south.

One of the six classical orbital elements2 is the right ascension of the ascending node (Ω). Ω describes the angle in the equatorial plane between the ascending node and the vector Î, which points from the Earth's center to the vernal equinox. In older books, Ω is sometimes called the longitude of the ascending node - this is incorrect; it is not a longitude. Ω is sometimes, in shorthand, referred to simply as the "node"; it should usually be clear from context whether "node" refers to an angle (Ω) or a line (the intersection of the two planes above).


1Orbits come in elliptical, circular, parabolic, and hyperbolic shapes. Since these are formed by the intersection of a cone and a plane, they each lie in a single plane.

2Six elements are required to completely describe the state of an orbit. There are many different sets of these elements. The "classical" (or Keplerian) elements are among the most intuitive of these, and consist of the semimajor axis (a), the eccentricity (e), the true anomoly (ν) (that's a nu), the inclination (i), the right ascension of the ascending node (Ω), and the argument of perigee (ω).



In finite element modeling, a body being acted upon by a force is divided up into many segments (elements). In each cross-section thus revealed (that is, on each end of each segment), a single point is chosen for the purpose of analysis. This point is called a node.

In planning and modeling terminology, a node is a conjunction of several paths. Typically an important and developed area because it serves as a "break of bulk" point where people and goods are moved from one form of transportation to another. A seaport, airport, or train station would be good examples of nodes.

Because nodes are locate at the conjunction of multiple paths, locations providing goods and services to those traveling along the associated paths often spring up, a dynamic reinforced if a node is a "break of bulk" point.

noddy = N = Nominal Semidestructor

node n.

1. [Internet, UUCP] A host machine on the network. 2. [MS-DOS BBSes] A dial-in line on a BBS. Thus an MS-DOS sysop might say that his BBS has 4 nodes even though it has a single machine and no Internet link, confusing an Internet hacker no end.

--The Jargon File version 4.3.1, ed. ESR, this entry manually entered by rootbeer277.

Node (?), n. [L. nodus; perh. akin to E. knot. Cf. Noose, Nowed.]

1. A knot, a knob; a protuberance; a swelling.

2. Specifically:

(a) Astron.

One of the two points where the orbit of a planet, or comet, intersects the ecliptic, or the orbit of a satellite intersects the plane of the orbit of its primary.

(b) Bot.

The joint of a stem, or the part where a leaf or several leaves are inserted.

(c) Dialing

A hole in the gnomon of a dial, through which passes the ray of light which marks the hour of the day, the parallels of the sun's declination, his place in the ecliptic, etc.

(d) Geom.

The point at which a curve crosses itself, being a double point of the curve. See Crunode, and Acnode.

(e) Mech.

The point at which the lines of a funicular machine meet from different angular directions; -- called also knot. W. R. Johnson.

(f) Poet.

The knot, intrigue, or plot of a piece.

(g) Med.

A hard concretion or incrustation which forms upon bones attacked with rheumatism, gout, or syphilis; sometimes also, a swelling in the neighborhood of a joint. Dunglison.

(h) Mus

One of the fixed points of a sonorous string, when it vibrates by aliquot parts, and produces the harmonic tones; nodal line or point.

(i) Zool.

A swelling.

Ascending node Astron., the node at which the body is passing northerly, marked with the symbol &astascending;, called the Dragon's head. Called also northern node. -- Descending node, the node at which the body is moving southwardly, marked thus &astdescending;, called Dragon's tail. -- Line of nodes, a straight line joining the two nodes of an orbit.

 

© Webster 1913.

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