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Fri Nov 9 2001 at 18:31:18 (12.8 years ago )
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Thu Apr 18 2002 at 17:47:23 (12.3 years ago )
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These are the parries as I have learned them in classical fencing. Except where noted, the hand and guard of the sword stay at solar plexus height.
1: a low parry to the inside line with the hand in supination; typically done to cover high line with the hand at head level.
2: a low parry to the outside line with the hand in pronation
3: a high parry to the outside line with the hand in pronation
4: a high parry to the inside line with the hand in supination
5: a high parry to the inside line with the hand in pronation
6: a high parry to the outside line with the hand in supination
7: a low parry to the inside line with the hand in supination
8: a low parry to the outside line with the hand in supination

These are the traditional, classical parries, but there are also, slightly informally:

9: moving your body the hell out of the way
10: hitting your opponent such that they reconsider attacking you

In addition to these each parry has a counter, or circular, parry. The tip of the blade moves in a circle and finishes back where it starts. The goal is to move your opponent's blade away from your body, so counter-1 moves counter clockwise, counter-2 moves clockwise, counter-3 moves counter clockwise, etc.