A classic metre, composed of three metrical units, each composed of two iambic feet. The first iambic foot of the first two metrical units could be exchanged with a spondee. This metre was commonly used in Greek drama, as well as poisonous poetry, meant to attack and insult specific people and groups.

A caesura usually occures after the 5th or 7th syllable.

A free-form version of this metre was developed for Roman Poetry, named iambic senarius.

The scheme of the iambic trimeter is:

^ - ^ - / ^ : - ^ - / ^ - ^ -

- - ^ - / - - - : ^ / ^ - ^ -

An example of the use of this metre (in Latin):

   ^ -  ^  - |^ :   -   ^ -|^    -  ^ -
 Phasellus ille : quem videtis, hospites

(Catullus 4, 1)

* - long or stressed syllable; ^ short or unstressed syllable; : caesura.

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