Ex*ten"u*ate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Extenuated(?); p. pr. & vb. n. Extenuating(?).] [L. extenuatus, p. p. of extenuare to make thin, loosen, weaken; ex out + tenuare to make thin, tenuis thin. See Tenuity.]

1.

To make thin or slender; to draw out so as to lessen the thickness.

His body behind the head becomes broad, from whence it is again extenuated all the way to the tail. Grew.

2.

To lessen; to palliate; to lessen or weaken the force of; to diminish the conception of, as crime, guilt, faults, ills, accusations, etc.; -- opposed to aggravate.

But fortune there extenuates the crime. Dryden.

Let us extenuate, conceal, adorn the unpleasing reality. I. Taylor.

3.

To lower or degrade; to detract from.

[Obs.]

Who can extenuate thee? Milton.

Syn. -- To palliate; to mitigate. See Palliate.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ex*ten"u*ate, v. i.

To become thinner; to make excuses; to advance palliating considerations.

Burke.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ex*ten"u*ate (?), a. [L. extenuatus, p. p.]

Thin; slender.

[Obs.]

Huloet.

 

© Webster 1913.

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