In chess parlance, the term economical mate refers to a checkmate where every one of the winning side's remaining pieces, with the exception of the king and pawns, contributes to the checkmate. Here is an example of an economical mate, derived from a 1929 problem by Joseph Cumpe:
+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |WK |
+---+---+---+---+
|BK |BB |   |WR |
+---+---+---+---+
|   |BP |   |WB |
+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   
+---+---+---+---+
|WR |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+

Note how no white piece can be removed without lifting the checkmate: the leftmost rook and the bishop contribute by attacking the king's possible flight squares, while the other rook completes the mate by preventing the black bishop from blocking the check. Below is one more economical example, derived from a 1902 problem by Godfrey Heathcote:
+---+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   |   
+---+---+---+---+---+
|WB |WP |BK |   |WQ |
+---+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   |   
+---+---+---+---+---+
|   |WK |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+

Both positions above are also pure, hence illustrating model mates.

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