The song was originally written in 1859 by musician Daniel Decatur Emmett, who was from Ohio, for a minstrel show he was working with in New York. It surged in popularity, and was used by the 1860 Lincoln campaign. It was used in a stage play in New Orleans in 1860 and spread through the South, and was played at the inauguration of Jefferson Davis in February of 1861.
On April 20, 1861 the Nashville Courier published a new, militant version of the lyrics, written by Albert Pike of Arkansas. The song was used as the anthem of the Confederacy.
Emmett is said to have remarked during the War, "...if I had known to what use they were going to put my song, I will be damned if I'd have written it."

Emmett’s lyrics:

I wish I was in the land of cotton,
Old times there are not forgotten;
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!
In Dixie's Land where I was born in,
Early on one frosty morning,
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!

Chorus:
Then I wish I was in Dixie! Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie's Land I'll take my stand, to live and die in Dixie!
Away! Away! Away down South in Dixie!
Away! Away! Away down South in Dixie!

Old Missus married "Will the Weaver";
William was a gay deceiver!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!
But when he put his arm around her,
Smiled as fierce as a forty-pounder!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!--

Chorus

His face was sharp as a butcher's cleaver;
But that did not seem to grieve her!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!
Old Missus acted the foolish part
And died for a man that broke her heart!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!--

Chorus

Now here's a health to the next old missus
And all the gals that want to kiss us!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!
But if you want to drive away sorrow,
Come and hear this song tomorrow!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!--

Chorus

There's buckwheat cakes and Injin batter,
Makes you fat or a little fatter!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!
Then hoe it down and scratch your gravel,
To Dixie's Land I'm bound to travel!
Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie's Land!--

Chorus

Pike’s lyrics:

Southrons, hear your country call you!
Up, lest worse than death befall you!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Lo! All the beacon-fires are lighted,
Let all hearts be now united!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!

Chorus:
Advance the flag of Dixie
Hurrah! Hurrah!
For Dixie's land we take our stand,
And live or die for Dixie!
To Arms! To Arms!
And conquer peace for Dixie
To Arms! To Arms
And conquer peace for Dixie

Hear the Northern thunders mutter!
Northern flags in South winds flutter!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Send them back your fierce defiance!
Stamp upon the accursed alliance!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!

Chorus

Fear no danger! Shun no labor!
Lift up rifle, pike and saber!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Shoulder pressing close to shoulder,
Let the odds make each heart bolder!
To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!

Chorus

Swear upon our country's altar
Never to submit or to falter,
To arms ! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!
Till the spoilers are defeated,
Till the Lord's work is completed!
To arms ! To arms! To arms, in Dixie!

Chorus

``Dixie'' refers to the ten-dollar bank notes which were used to pay riverboat men in New Orleans when they came down the Mississippi River. The New Orleans banks used the French word ``dix'' (meaning ``ten'') on these notes, and so the name ``Dixie'' was formed.

Dixie is a beer microbrewed in New Orleans since 1907. It's aged in cypress barrels for flavor, although flavor is not what it's known for. It's cheap, light, and goes well with heavily-spiced crawfish.

Dix"ie (?), n.

A colloquial name for the Southern portion of the United States, esp. during the Civil War.

[U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913.

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