A diplomatic term used especially to describe when one nation wants another nation to change its ways.

An example is the critical dialogue between Denmark and China. The Danish consumers would like to buy cheap products, but most of them are clever enough to realise that money is not everything - hence products made by underpaid children in slave like factories are not likely to end up in the Danish shopping basket.

However, as Danish companies want to export goods to China (and Danish consumers still wants cheap stuff), the politicians have started a critical dialogue with China in hope of making the Chinese realise that what their companies are doing is wrong. Also, the bold Danes have tried to - in very diplomatic terms - to say Since it's a dialogue, China can respond back to justify their actions, which will usually supply Denmark with new arguments or suggestions on how to change things making all people happy.

The most fascinating thing about this is that it seems to work. Slowly - the statements by the Danes affect China. They make the government see that if you really want to play the capitalistic game, you have to play it by the rules. Funny that a small country like Denmark has got this power/courage - China has about 240 times as many inhabitants.

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