Also a computer security group meaning Computer Operations, Audit, and Security Technology that was at Purdue University, but has now moved on to the much grander and more eloquent name of CERIAS. One of the more known projects of this group was Tripwire which has since been licensed to some odd company or another.

To Iceberg Slim and his contemporaries, this was a jivespeak verb that referred to the constant nodding actions of a heroin addict. A whore that engages in coasting is one that you need to cut loose, fast.

A coast is a margin of land where the land meets the sea. It is area of varying width which includes the offshore, foreshore and backshore zones. The coastline is the line where the land and sea meet -- the average tidal line, whereas the coast itself includes the continental shelf and the coastal plains.

Other terms used to describe coastal areas include:

  • Shore - the area between low and high tide.
  • Beach - the accumulated loose sediments of sand, shell and rocks of the fore and backshore zones.

    There are many different kinds of coasts (eg. sandy, rocky, cliffed, muddy). Most people prefer the sandy beach as it generally offers more to the user, like safer and cleaner swimming areas and soft, clean sand for sunbaking.

    As mentioned before, the three zones of the beach system are the offshore, foreshore and backshore areas. The offshore extends from low tide out to a depth where wave action doesn't disturb the sediments on the sea floor. The foreshore the the area between the low and high tide levels. Finally, the backshore zone is above the high water mark and extends inland to wherever marine influences, eg. sea spray, still occur.

  • Coast (?), n. [OF. coste, F. cote, rib, hill, shore, coast, L. costa rib, side. Cf. Accost, v. t., Cutlet.]

    1.

    The side of a thing.

    [Obs.]

    Sir I. Newton.

    2.

    The exterior line, limit, or border of a country; frontier border.

    [Obs.]

    From the river, the river Euphrates, even to the uttermost sea, shall your coast be. Deut. xi. 24.

    3.

    The seashore, or land near it.

    He sees in English ships the Holland coast. Dryden.

    We the Arabian coast do know At distance, when the species blow. Waller.

    The coast is clear, the danger is over; no enemy in sight.

    Dryden.

    Fig.: There are no obstacles. "Seeing that the coast was clear, Zelmane dismissed Musidorus."

    Sir P. Sidney.

    Coast guard. (a) A body of men originally employed along the coast to prevent smuggling; now, under the control of the admiralty, drilled as a naval reserve. [Eng.] (b) The force employed in lifesaving stations along the seacoast. [U. S.] -- Coast rat Zool., a South African mammal (Bathyergus suillus), about the size of a rabbit, remarkable for its extensive burrows; -- called also sand mole. -- Coast waiter, a customhouse officer who superintends the landing or shipping of goods for the coast trade. [Eng.]

     

    © Webster 1913.


    Coast (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Coasted; p. pr. & vb. n. Coasting.] [OE. costien, costeien, costen, OF. costier, costoier, F. cotoyer, fr. Of. coste coast, F. cote. See Coast, n.]

    1.

    To draw or keep near; to approach.

    [Obs.]

    Anon she hears them chant it lustily, And all in haste she coasteth to the cry. Shak.

    2.

    To sail by or near the shore.

    The ancients coasted only in their navigation. Arbuthnot.

    3.

    To sail from port to port in the same country.

    4. [Cf. OF. coste, F. cote, hill, hillside.]

    To slide down hill; to slide on a sled, upon snow or ice.

    [Local, U. S.]

     

    © Webster 1913.


    Coast, v. t.

    1.

    To draw near to; to approach; to keep near, or by the side of.

    [Obs.]

    Hakluyt.

    2.

    To sail by or near; to follow the coast line of.

    Nearchus, . . . not knowing the compass, was fain to coast that shore. Sir T. Browne.

    3.

    To conduct along a coast or river bank.

    [Obs.]

    The Indians . . . coasted me along the river. Hakluyt.

     

    © Webster 1913.

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