Bilge (?), n. [A different orthography of bulge, of same origin as belly. Cf. Belly, Bulge.]

1.

The protuberant part of a cask, which is usually in the middle.

2. Naut.

That part of a ship's hull or bottom which is broadest and most nearly flat, and on which she would rest if aground.

3.

Bilge water.

Bilge free Naut., stowed in such a way that the bilge is clear of everything; -- said of a cask. -- Bilge pump, a pump to draw the bilge water from the hold of a ship. -- Bilge water Naut., water which collects in the bilge or bottom of a ship or other vessel. It is often allowed to remain till it becomes very offensive. -- Bilge ways, the timbers which support the cradle of a ship upon the ways, and which slide upon the launching ways in launching the vessel.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bilge (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bilged (); p. pr. & vb. n. Bilging.]

1. Naut.

To suffer a fracture in the bilge; to spring a leak by a fracture in the bilge.

2.

To bulge.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bilge, v. t.

1. Naut.

To fracture the bilge of, or stave in the bottom of (a ship or other vessel).

2.

To cause to bulge.

 

© Webster 1913.

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