Whoop (), n. [See Hoopoe.] Zool.

The hoopoe.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whoop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Whooped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Whooping.] [OE. houpen. See Hoop, v. i.]

1.

To utter a whoop, or loud cry, as eagerness, enthusiasm, or enjoyment; to cry out; to shout; to halloo; to utter a war whoop; to hoot, as an owl.

Each whooping with a merry shout. Wordsworth.

When naught was heard but now and then the howl Of some vile cur, or whooping of the owl. W. Browne.

2.

To cough or breathe with a sonorous inspiration, as in whooping cough.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whoop, v. t.

To insult with shouts; to chase with derision.

And suffered me by the voice of slaves to be Whooped out of Rome. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whoop (?), n.

1.

A shout of pursuit or of war; a very of eagerness, enthusiasm, enjoyment, vengeance, terror, or the like; an halloo; a hoot, or cry, as of an owl.

A fox, crossing the road, drew off a considerable detachment, who clapped spurs to their horses, and pursued him with whoops and halloos. Addison.

The whoop of the crane. Longfellow.

2.

A loud, shrill, prolonged sound or sonorous inspiration, as in whooping cough.

 

© Webster 1913.

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