Whirling - the action of picking someone up, sticking their head in a toilet, and flushing. It's always a good idea to pre-flush (we wouldn't want to be unsanitary, would we?) syn. swirlie.

This is a traditional activity at Harvey Mudd College. There are some that believe that it's an abominable act, and since it is hazing, should be eliminated. I'm an agnostic on this issue, since I managed to get through Mudd without participating on either side. As a resident of West Dorm, I did get to see my fair share of whirls, though.

The typical definition of whirling in the freshman lookbooks is "ask an upperclassman for a free demonstration."

The typical victim of a whirling has done something to deserve it. Usual reasons include being elected dorm dork, having the highest dorm debt, or living in South dorm (and loitering in the West Dorm courtyard during a dorm meeting).

Some individuals are encouraged to self-whirl if they've done something wrong, but nobody wants to be troubled with whirling them. Amazingly enough, there are some people who actually will engage in a self-whirling.

Particulary deserving individuals get to be participants in an Around the Whirled. This consists of being taken to every toilet in the dorm (which includes 27 whirls, if the whirlers remember the fast lane and the laundry room).

A note on technique

It's important to get the whirlee's arms and legs under control. Not only does this help prevent injury from flailage, but it's a lot easier to carry someone to a toilet if they're not grabbing onto couches, doorways, or pinbot. And be careful when whirling someone with long hair.

If you're the victim of a whirling, and you want everyone to be involved to have a good time, it's important to flail around a bit. Nobody likes carrying a rag doll to a toilet to whirl them; it's much more entertaining to whirl someone who fights back. Victims of whirling usually come back to shake themselves dry or hug their attackers.

Whirl"ing (?),

a. & n. from Whirl, v. t.

Whirling table. (a) Physics An apparatus provided with one or more revolving disks, with weights, pulleys, and other attachments, for illustrating the phenomena and laws of centrifugal force, and the like. (b) A potter's wheel.

 

© Webster 1913.

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