Wain"scot (?), n. [OD. waeghe-schot, D. wagen-schot, a clapboard, fr. OD. waeg, weeg, a wall (akin to AS. wah; cf. Icel. veggr) + schot a covering of boards (akin to E. shot, shoot).]

1.

Oaken timber or boarding.

[Obs.]

A wedge wainscot is fittest and most proper for cleaving of an oaken tree. Urquhart.

Inclosed in a chest of wainscot. J. Dart.

2. Arch.

A wooden lining or boarding of the walls of apartments, usually made in panels.

3. Zool.

Any one of numerous species of European moths of the family Leucanidae.

⇒ They are reddish or yellowish, streaked or lined with black and white. Their larvae feed on grasses and sedges.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wain"scot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wainscoted; p. pr. & vb. n. Wainscoting.]

To line with boards or panelwork, or as if with panelwork; as, to wainscot a hall.

Music soundeth better in chambers wainscoted than hanged. Bacon.

The other is wainscoted with looking-glass. Addison.

 

© Webster 1913.

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