Vol"ley (?), n.; pl. Volleys (#). [F. vol'ee; flight, a volley, or discharge of several guns, fr. voler to fly, L. volare. See Volatile.]

1.

A flight of missiles, as arrows, bullets, or the like; the simultaneous discharge of a number of small arms.

Fiery darts in flaming volleys flew. Milton.

Each volley tells that thousands cease to breathe. Byron.

2.

A burst or emission of many things at once; as, a volley of words.

"This volley of oaths."

B. Jonson.

Rattling nonsense in full volleys breaks. Pope.

3. (a) Tennis

A return of the ball before it touches the ground.

(b) Cricket

A sending of the ball full to the top of the wicket.

Half volley. (a) Tennis A return of the ball immediately after is has touched the ground. (b) Cricket A sending of the ball so that after touching the ground it flies towards the top of the wicket. R. A. Proctor. -- On the volley, at random. [Obs.] "What we spake on the volley begins work." Massinger. -- Volley gun, a gun with several barrels for firing a number of shots simultaneously; a kind of mitrailleuse.

 

© Webster 1913.


Vol"ley (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Volleyed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Volleying.]

To discharge with, or as with, a volley.

 

© Webster 1913.


Vol"ley, v. i.

1.

To be thrown out, or discharged, at once; to be discharged in a volley, or as if in a volley; to make a volley or volleys.

Tennyson.

2. (a) Tennis

To return the ball before it touches the ground.

(b) (Cricket)

To send the ball full to the top of the wicket.

R. A. Proctor.

 

© Webster 1913.

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