Vie (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Vied (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Vying (?).] [OE. vien, shortened fr. envien, OF. envier to invite, to challenge, a word used in gambling, L. invitare to invite; of uncertain origin. Cf. Invite, Envie.]

1.

To stake a sum upon a hand of cards, as in the old game of gleek. See Revie.

[Obs.]

2.

To strive for superiority; to contend; to use emulous effort, as in a race, contest, or competition.

In a trading nation, the younger sons may be placed in such a way of life as . . . to vie with the best of their family. Addison.

While Waterloo with Cannae's carnage vies. Byron.

 

© Webster 1913.


Vie, v. t.

1.

To stake; to wager.

[Obs.]

B. Jonson.

2.

To do or produce in emulation, competition, or rivalry; to put in competition; to bandy.

[Obs.]

She hung about my neck; and kiss on kiss She vied so fast. Shak.

Nor was he set over us to vie wisdom with his Parliament, but to be guided by them. Milton.

And vying malice with my gentleness, Pick quarrels with their only happiness. Herbert.

 

© Webster 1913.


Vie, n.

A contest for superiority; competition; rivalry; strife; also, a challenge; a wager.

[Obs.]

We 'll all to church together instantly, And then a vie for boys. J. Fletcher.

 

© Webster 1913.

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