Vibrate is a bit of occult jargon that is interesting in that the users don't seem to agree on what exactly it means. This, of course, makes it difficult for any solitary practitioner of magic who sees this word used in instructions -- what do they mean? I have seen it used to mean: The last one is particularly interesting because while some instructions are given in Liber O, according to Tim Maroney you need the secret occult fraternity knowledge, which he happily shares because he feels that his time with an occult fraternity was a waste. I'm going to paraphrase and shorten the ritual below; you can read his full discussion on it (and the rest of the Lesser Banishing) at http://maroney.org/Essays/Pentagram_Ritual.html.

While standing up straight and holding your arms straight out at your sides, blow all the air out of your lungs. Next, close your eyes and inhale through your nose, visualizing that the breath is the name. (In other words, you are inhaling the name into you.) While doing so, slowly fluidly sweep your forearms so that your fists are on your temples. Visualize the breath-name slowly (but not so slow you're gasping) moving down from your lungs to your feet.

When it reaches your feet, visualize it rebounding back up with a surge of energy. Throw yourself forward, moving your left foot about a foot forward to catch yourself, your hands together like a diver and your torso parallel to the floor. As all this is happening, blow the air out your nose, but project the name straight ahead, as if it was a laser beam shooting out from your hands to infinity.

To finish, return to a standing posture, with your left arm at your side. Hold your right index finger to your lips as if to shush someone. It is arguable that this posture in the Egyptian depiction of Harpocrates might refer instead to childhood and thumb-sucking (which, interestingly, was often linked to wisdom in ancient cultures), so if that speaks to you more, you can try it.

Vi"brate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Vibrate (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Vibrating.] [L. vibratus, p. p. of vibrare, v. t. & v. i., to snake, brandish, vibrate; akin to Skr. vip to tremble, Icel. veifa to wave, vibrate. See Waive and cf. Whip, v. t.]

1.

To brandish; to move to and fro; to swing; as, to vibrate a sword or a staff.

2.

To mark or measure by moving to and fro; as, a pendulum vibrating seconds.

3.

To affect with vibratory motion; to set in vibration.

Breath vocalized, that is, vibrated or undulated, may . . . impress a swift, tremulous motion. Holder.

Star to star vibrates light. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Vi"brate (?), v. i.

1.

To move to and fro, or from side to side, as a pendulum, an elastic rod, or a stretched string, when disturbed from its position of rest; to swing; to oscillate.

2.

To have the constituent particles move to and fro, with alternate compression and dilation of parts, as the air, or any elastic body; to quiver.

3.

To produce an oscillating or quivering effect of sound; as, a whisper vibrates on the ear.

Pope.

4.

To pass from one state to another; to waver; to fluctuate; as, a man vibrates between two opinions.

 

© Webster 1913.

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