In spite of Webster 1913, says, "twopence" is properly pronouced as "tuppence" (tup"pence'). Although twopence literally means two pennies, it can also be used figuratively to refer to any small amount of money.

I wouldn't give you twopence for that cheap toy, squire.

In the Disney movie Mary Poppins, birdfeed costs twopence a bag. Michael Banks, the young boy that Mary Poppins looks after, wants to buy a bag from the bird-woman at St. Paul's Cathedral, but his father won't let him. Instead, the father wants Michael to put the money in the bank. Michael refuses and, in the ruckus that follows, causes a run on the bank. So Michael's father's career at the bank is (temporarily, at least) ruined; all for the want of twopence.

Incidently, the beautiful song from the movie, "Feed the birds" was supposedly Walt Disney's absolute favorite Disney song.


A small coin, and money of account, in England, equivalent to two pennies, -- minted to a fixed annual amount, for almsgiving by the sovereign on Maundy Thursday.


© Webster 1913.

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