trio

drummer...

that spastic
plastic soldier
of elastic misfortune-
to have free reign
over this insane
mainline pain factory
emotion in his portion
distortion of sound
through skin

to begin this
pitter-patter
smattering and
growing to a din,
this den of wooden
spinning mayhem
to save them
from the song.

bassist...

what a wonderful
walking talking
machine who
feeds
the low
slow
scheme
of things
in the
bottom end...
a beautiful friend
in this drowned-out
down-and-around
dream theater of sparkling
freedom he bends the strings
of steel to make the people
feel the undertones
in the heart
in the
soul
slow-home.


saxophonist...

sensual
sliding
sensation
of elation
that you sing
reminiscent
of caresses
that the
heart
strings
bring
when
love
is at
its peak
speak a
solemn
history
romance
in this
solo
soho
symphony
on a sax
singing,
smelling,
selling
auditory
sex
to
every
simple
pleasure
in the room.

A trio is also an important part of most marches (played by an orchestra or marching band). It is typically in a higher key and goes from a 2/2 time signature to a 3/4 time signature. It uses a similar musical idiom as the refrain, with a few alterations to make it stand out a bit more.

Webster extends this musical structure to minuets and scherzos as well, though I do not know enough about them to know if they also follow these rules.

A classical march is laid out as follows:
Refrain x2
Trio x2
Refrain

Tri"o (?), n. [It., fr. L. tres, tria, three: cf. F. trio, from the Italian. See Three.]

1.

Three, considered collectively; three in company or acting together; a set of three; three united.

The trio were well accustomed to act together, and were linked to each other by ties of mutual interest. Dickens.

2. Mus. (a)

A composition for three parts or three instruments.

(b)

The secondary, or episodical, movement of a minuet or scherzo, as in a sonata or symphony, or of a march, or of various dance forms; -- not limited to three parts or instruments.

 

© Webster 1913.

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