Tinge (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tinged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Tingeing (?).] [L. tingere, tinctum, to dye, stain, wet; akin to Gr. , and perhaps to G. tunken to dip, OHG. tunchon, dunchon, thunkon. Cf. Distain, Dunker, Stain, Taint a stain, to stain, Tincture, Tint.]

To imbue or impregnate with something different or foreign; as, to tinge a decoction with a bitter taste; to affect in some degree with the qualities of another substance, either by mixture, or by application to the surface; especially, to color slightly; to stain; as, to tinge a blue color with red; an infusion tinged with a yellow color by saffron.

His [Sir Roger's] virtues, as well as imperfections, are tinged by a certain extravagance. Addison.

Syn. -- To color; dye; stain.

 

© Webster 1913.


Tinge, n.

A degree, usually a slight degree, of some color, taste, or something foreign, infused into another substance or mixture, or added to it; tincture; color; dye; hue; shade; taste.

His notions, too, respecting the government of the state, took a tinge from his notions respecting the government of the church. Macaulay.

 

© Webster 1913.

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