A little story about traffic tickets...

Did you know that some street intersections have cameras mounted by the stop lights? Some of the busier ones in my town do. Some of the cameras even have little radar guns by them. Usually, they're just there to monitor traffic, but every once in a while, when someone speeds through a red light, the camara will take a picture of the car and licence plate. Then, about a week later, you'll get a nice little envelope with the picture of your car speeding the red light and a ticket to go with it.

So this person got one of these tickets, wrote out a check, took a picture of the check with his polaroid camara, and send the snapshot of the check in with his ticket.

A few weeks later, he got a picture back from the court that displayed a pair of handcuffs.

The man paid the ticket.

Tick"et (?), n. [F. 'etiquette a label, ticket, fr. OF. estiquette, or OF. etiquet, estiquet; both of Teutonic origin, and akin to E. stick. See Stick, n. & v., and cf. Etiquette, Tick credit.]

A small piece of paper, cardboard, or the like, serving as a notice, certificate, or distinguishing token of something.

Specifically: --

(a)

A little note or notice.

[Obs. or Local]

He constantly read his lectures twice a week for above forty years, giving notice of the time to his auditors in a ticket on the school doors. Fuller.

(b)

A tradesman's bill or account.

[Obs.]

⇒ Hence the phrase on ticket, on account; whence, by abbreviation, came the phrase on tick. See 1st Tick.

Your courtier is mad to take up silks and velvets On ticket for his mistress. J. Cotgrave.

(c)

A certificate or token of right of admission to a place of assembly, or of passage in a public conveyance; as, a theater ticket; a railroad or steamboat ticket.

(d)

A label to show the character or price of goods.

(e)

A certificate or token of a share in a lottery or other scheme for distributing money, goods, or the like.

(f) Politics

A printed list of candidates to be voted for at an election; a set of nominations by one party for election; a ballot.

[U.S.]

The old ticket forever! We have it by thirty-four votes. Sarah Franklin (1766).

Scratched ticket, a ticket from which the names of one or more of the candidates are scratched out. -- Split ticket, a ticket representing different divisions of a party, or containing candidates selected from two or more parties. -- Straight ticket, a ticket containing the regular nominations of a party, without change. -- Ticket day Com., the day before the settling or pay day on the stock exchange, when the names of the actual purchasers are rendered in by one stockbroker to another. [Eng.] Simmonds. -- Ticket of leave, a license or permit given to a convict, or prisoner of the crown, to go at large, and to labor for himself before the expiration of his sentence, subject to certain specific conditions. [Eng.] Simmonds. -- Ticket porter, a licensed porter wearing a badge by which he may be identified. [Eng.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Tick"et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ticketed; p. pr. & vb. n. Ticketing.]

1.

To distinguish by a ticket; to put a ticket on; as, to ticket goods.

2.

To furnish with a tickets; to book; as, to ticket passengers to California.

[U.S.]

<-- Ticketed. having a ticket, esp. a ticket for travel on a carrier sucha as an airline. A term used to distinguish those who have made a reservation for travel, but have not yet paid and received their ticket, from those who have. "You have a reservation, but you have not yet been ticketed." -->

 

© Webster 1913.

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