The alias of a radio personality named Michael Anderson, who broadcasts a once-a-week overnight program for WFMU. An amazing historian of black music (his show is called "Music of Our Times", covering roughly WWII to disco, encompassing anything from Pharoah Sanders to Peter Tosh to organ trios), and, it would seem, possessor of the largest and coolest record collection this side of John Peel.

Each show is based around a theme; as I type this, it appears to be a Hendrix Night, but with The Doctor's usual twist: recordings from Jimi's 50s influences, like Otis Rush and Johnny "Guitar" Watson, then some recordings from chitlin circuit days (when he was Jimmy Hendrix), including some Isley Brothers and Little Richard material (Jimi was a guitarist for both)... then the Actual Jimi Stuff, but with a liberal dose of rarities and oddities - not the rote oh-not-again same-old that a "classic rock" station would trot out.

The Doctor plays "black music", but that encompasses just about everything - if Olduvai Gorge is Ground Zero for mankind, then Stravinsky and Prokofiev are "black music" too, according to Cecil Taylor - an evening of garage psychedelia counts, since it's essentially soul music on acid; jam band Zappa and a Led Zeppelin bootleg is as blues as Muddy Waters... It makes for great, unpredictable radio - even if he shows up to the studio tired and bleary-eyed, The Doctor makes it a long, strange trip of a party... "edutainment" (what a stupid word!) minus the castor-oil connotations.

He was there, hangin' out, when Philly Soul had its first great heyday in the late 60s (making for great Soul Nights; no obscure 45 is too scratchy to play), and is a Ra-ologist of the first rank, even appearing on a recording or two during The Arkestra's Philadelphia phase.

"The Good Doctor" is also a great play by Neil Simon, set in 19th century Russia.

The play consists of a number of stories, some funny, some sad. These stories are tied together by the narrator, an author who is trying out his newest ideas on the audience. He has come to point in his life, where he isn't sure anymore if he's doing what he really wants to do and is seeking reassurance from the audience.

Here is part of his introductory monologue and two excerpts from later scenes:

... But I've done a good deal of writing in here. ... Perhaps too much. ... I look out the window and think that life is passing me at a furious rate. So, I ask myself the question ... what force is it that compels me to write so incessantly, day after day, page after page, story after story. ... And the answer is quite simple. ... I have no choice. ... I am a writer.

Excerpt from "The Seduction":

Peter Semyonych: ... If I may say so myself, I am the greatest seducer of other men's wives that I've ever met. ... I say this not boastfully, but as a matter of record. The staggering figures speak for themselves. ... For those men interested in playing this highly satisfying but often dangerous game, I urge you to take out pen and paper and takes notes. ... I am going to explain my methods. ... In defense, married women may do likewise but it will do them little good if they happen to be the chosen victim. ... My method has never failed. ... Now then, there are three vital characteristics needed. ... They are, patience, more patience and still more patience. ... Those who do not have the strength to wait and persist, I urge you to take up bicycling ... rowing, perhaps. ... Seducing isn't for you. ... Now then, in order to seduce a man's wife, you must, I repeat must, keep as far from her as possible. ... Pay her practically no attention at all. Ignore her if you must. We will get to her - through her husband.

...

Wife: I think it's nonsense. ... How did he put it to you? I mean, did he actually say "a tipical Russian beauty"?
Husband: Precisely ... And that it would be a damn shame if that exquisite face missed the chance to become immortalized for all the world. ... That's exactly what he said.
Wife: He gets carried away by his own voice. ... Those exact words? You didn't leave anything out?
Husband: Oh, yes ... "That lovely face" ... I left out "that lovely face". ... He said that a number of times, I think. ...
Wife: He does go on, doesn't he? ... How many times did he say it? Once? Twice? What?
Husband: Let me think. It's hard to remember
Wife: It's not important ... but in the future I wish you would write these things down.
Peter: ... Have you seen me near her? ... Have you heard me speak to her? ... Has any correspondence passed between us? ... No, my dear pupils. ... And yet she hangs on my every word uttered by her husband. ... Awesome, isn't it? ... We apply this treatment from two to three weeks. ... Her resistance is weaking, weakening, weakening.

Excerpt from "The Arrangement":

Father: ...By God, it's a difficult business being a liberal father.
Girl: Evening gentlemen!
Boy: Oh, God.
Father: Steady, boy, steady.
Boy: Is she ... is she one of the teachers?
Father: She looks like the principal to me. ... We're in luck, son. She's a charming looking girl. ... I'll go over and  attend to your tuition.
Boy: Father ... couldn't I take a correspondence course?
Father: No! Stand there! Don't move! ... I'll be right back ... and don't twiddle with your hat. ... This is not hat twiddling business. ... Good evening, Madame. ... A lovely April night, wouldn't you say?
Girl: Is it April already? ... I don't get out very much.
Father: No, I can well understand that. ... It's er ... it's been a long time since I've been involved in such matters, but I would like to discuss with you a subject of some delicacy.
Girl: 30 Rubles!
Father: So much for the delicacy. ... 30 Rubles you say. ... Well, speaking for myself, I would say 30 Rubles was quite fair. ... But it's not for me. It's for my young, inexperienced son. That's him! The one with the knees buckling.
Girl: It's still 30 Rubles, sir. We don't have children's prices down here.

The alias of a radio personality named Michael Anderson, who broadcasts a once-a-week overnight program for WFMU. An amazing historian of black music (his show is called "Music of Our Times", covering roughly WWII to disco, encompassing anything from Pharoah Sanders to Peter Tosh), and, it would seem, possessor of the largest and coolest record collection this side of John Peel. Each show is based around a theme; as I type this, it appears to be a Hendrix Night, but with The Doctor's usual twist: recordings from Jimi's 50s influences, like Otis Rush and Johnny "Guitar" Watson, then some recordings from chitlin circuit days (when he was Jimmy Hendrix), including some Isley Brothers and Little Richard material (Jimi was a guitarist in both groups)... The Doctor plays "black music", but that encompasses just about everything - if Olduvai Gorge is Ground Zero for mankind, then Stravinsky is "black music" too, according to Cecil Taylor - an evening of garage psychedelia counts, since it's essentially soul music on acid; jam band Zappa and a Led Zeppelin bootleg is as blues as Muddy Waters... It makes for great, unpredictable radio - even if he shows up to the studio bleary-eyed, he makes it a long, strange trip of a party... He was there, hangin' out, when Philly Soul had its first great heyday (making for great Soul Nights; no obscure 45 is too scratchy to play), and is a Ra-ologist of the first rank, even appearing on a recording or two during The Arkestra's Philadelphia phase.

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