If you read the November 15, 1992 edition of the New York Times, you might have read a "Styles of the Times" article about the then emerging grunge trend. You might also have read this sidebar about the hip new slang that the kids were using:

Lexicon of Grunge: Breaking the Code

All subcultures speak in code; grunge is no exception. Megan Jasper, a 25-year old sales representative at Caroline Records in Seattle, provided this lexicon of grunge-speak, coming soon to a high school or mall near you:

WACK SLACKS: Old ripped jeans

FUZZ: Heavy wool sweaters

PLATS: Platform shoes

KICKERS: Heavy boots

SWINGIN’ ON THE FLIPPITY-FLOP: Hanging out

BOUND-AND-HAGGED: Staying home on a Friday or Saturday night

SCORE: Great

HARSH REALM: Bummer

COB NOBBLER: Loser

DISH: Desirable guy

BLOATED, BIG BAG OF BLOATATION: Drunk

LAMESTAIN: Uncool person

TOM-TOM CLUB: Uncool outsiders

ROCK ON: A happy goodbye

As you’ve probably guessed by now, this is all fake. Jasper was real, and she worked for Sub Pop, but she was the perpetrator of a hoax on the Times and a British magazine, Sky. Tired of all the inquiring phone calls about grunge, she cooked up the fake slang and the journalists just ate it up. And they deserved it, not for being unhip, but for being lazy and not bothering to check their facts, content to take whatever the person answering the phones said as gospel. Suckers.

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