Strake (?), obs.

imp. of Strike.



© Webster 1913.

Strake, n. [See Streak.]


A streak.

[Obs.] Spenser."White strake." Gen. xxx. 37.


An iron band by which the fellies of a wheel are secured to each other, being not continuous, as the tire is, but made up of separate pieces.

3. Shipbuilding

One breadth of planks or plates forming a continuous range on the bottom or sides of a vessel, reaching from the stem to the stern; a streak.

⇒ The planks or plates next the keel are called the garboard strakes; the next, or the heavy strakes at the bilge, are the bilge strakes; the next, from the water line to the lower port sill, the wales; and the upper parts of the sides, the sheer strakes.

4. Mining

A trough for washing broken ore, gravel, or sand; a launder.


© Webster 1913.

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