Squab (?), a. [Cf. dial. Sw. sqvabb a soft and fat body, sqvabba a fat woman, Icel. kvap jelly, jellylike things, and and E. quab.]

1.

Fat; thick; plump; bulky.

Nor the squab daughter nor the wife were nice. Betterton.

2.

Unfledged; unfeathered; as, a squab pigeon.

King.

 

© Webster 1913.


Squab, n.

1. Zool.

A neatling of a pigeon or other similar bird, esp. when very fat and not fully fledged.

2.

A person of a short, fat figure.

Gorgonious sits abdominous and wan, Like a fat squab upon a Chinese fan. Cowper.

3.

A thickly stuffed cushion; especially, one used for the seat of a sofa, couch, or chair; also, a sofa.

Punching the squab of chairs and sofas. Dickens.

On her large squab you find her spread. Pope.

 

© Webster 1913.


Squab, adv. [Cf. dial. Sw. squapp, a word imitative of a splash, and E. squab fat, unfledged.]

With a heavy fall; plump.

[Vulgar]

The eagle took the tortoise up into the air, and dropped him down, squab, upon a rock. L'Estrange.

 

© Webster 1913.


Squab, v. i.

To fall plump; to strike at one dash, or with a heavy stroke.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.

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