Spat (?),

imp. of Spit. [Obs. or R.]

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, n. [From the root of spit; hence, literally, that which is ejected.]

A young oyster or other bivalve mollusk, both before and after it first becomes adherent, or such young, collectively.

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, v. i. & t.

To emit spawn; to emit, as spawn.

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, n. [Cf. Pat.]

1.

A light blow with something flat. [U.S. & Prov. Eng.]

2.

Hence, a petty combat, esp. a verbal one; a little quarrel, dispute, or dissension. [U. S.]

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, v. i.

To dispute. [R.] Smart.

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spatted; p. pr. & vb. n. Spatting.]

To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together; as the hands. [Local, U.S.]

Little Isabel leaped up and down, spatting her hands.
Judd.

 

© Webster 1913


Spat, n. [Short for Spatterdash.]

1.

A legging; a gaiter. [Scot. & Dial. Eng.]

2.

A kind of short cloth or leather gaiter worn over the upper part of the shoe and fastened beneath the instep; -- chiefly in pl.

 

© Webster 1913

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