The South Park Metanode


See also Matt Stone and Trey Parker Metanode

My favorite TV show of all time is South Park, and so I'm compiling a metanode of the many, many South Park nodes on e2. No doubt I've missed a lot, because there are millions. As I come across more I will add them, also as I remember more of the characters I will add them. Please, any help you can give me in compiling this by pointing out nodes I missed will be a blessing, so please msg them to me.


South Park Creators:
Trey Parker
Matt Stone

Main South Park Characters
Stan Marsh
Eric Cartman
Kyle Broflowski
Kenny McCormick

South Park Characters
Mephisto
Mr. Garrison
Mr. Twig
Mr Hat
Mrs. Cartman
Chef
Terrance and Phillip
Mr. Hankey
Wendy Testaburger
Pip
Mr. Mackey
Ike
Uncle Jimbo
Ned
Butters
Damien
Tweak
Timmy

Cameo Appearances
Fiona Apple
Barbara Streisand
Tina Yothers
Kathy Lee Gifford
Sally Struthers
Conan O'Brian

Musical Appearances
KoRn
Toto
Elton John
Primus
Ozzy Osborne
Ween
Meatloaf
Radiohead

South Park Movies & Music
South Park Bigger, Longer and Uncut
Chef Aid: The South Park Album
Mr. Hankey's Christmas Classics
Blame Canada

South Park Episodes
Episode 1 (Pilot): The Spirit of Christmas
The Red Badge of Gayness

Nodes related to South Park
kick ass
mmkay
Midget wearing a bikini
Chocolate Salty Balls
he turned my dog gay
Cheesy Poof Song
Cartman's Mom
Cartman
Cheesy Poofs
Beefcake
Snacky Cakes
Oh My God! They killed Kenny!
"Kyle's mom is a stupid bitch" in D minor
hella good
Fat-ass
Big-boned
Kyle's Mom's a Bitch
You go to hell! You go to hell and you die!
The South Park Alphabet
Uncle Fucker
It's Easy, Mmmkay
M'kay
Don't kick the baby
Fingerbang
Mecha-Streisand


Long before it was a show, South Park was a place. Not a real town, but a huge valley in Park County, Colorado. This valley is surrounded by very tall mountains (many in excess of 14,000 feet), and accessible by only one major road--US Highway 285 from over Kenosha Pass--though several smaller roads can get you there as well. The valley floor has an average elevation of about 9,500 feet and often sees extreme weather in the winter. Not too long ago, the entire area would often be closed to vehicles due to extreme winds and blowing snow that caused frequent white outs. One of the passes that comes into South Park is actually called Boreas Pass, after the god of the wind. These days, large fences have been erected alongside the roads in order to stop the blowing snow from closing the road.

South Park contains only a few towns, including Jefferson, Fairplay, Como, and Alma, which is the town with the highest elevation above sea level (in the United States), despite what Leadville will try to tell you.

South Park is used primarily for two things: agriculture and recreation. The recreation includes camping and fishing in the Lost Creek Wilderness Area and climbing fourteeners such as Mt. Democrat, Mt. Lincoln, Mt. Bross, Mt. Sherman, and several others. Many people also pass through here on their way to the Arkansas River to go rafting. Agricutlturally it is used mostly for grazing land and farm land.

Outside of the spectacular mountains and outdoor features, there aren't too many tourist attractions. One of the exptions is South Park City, a restored 1880s town. It is rather interesting and is worthwhile to see if you're interested in the history of the American West. Most of the buildings are actual buildings from some of the many ghost towns in Park County left over from the silver crash of 1893. South Park City is located in the largest town in the area (and also the Park County Seat, Fairplay. Fairplay also contains several good restaurants, particularly the Fairplay Hotel.

And as far as the show South Park is concerned, it has little to do with the actual place. The actual show is based more on the town of Conifer, where Trey Parker grew up. In fact, Mr. Mackey is a direct jab at an actual counselor at my old middle school, whose name is Mr. Lackey. The only real similarity is that both the real South Park and the South Park of the show are located in Park County, Colorado.

South Park is also the name of both a large county park and a township in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

The park was developed on 1,999 acres of farmland in the late 1920s, simultaneously with North Park. Trees had to be transplanted and new roads built.

Among the amenities in South Park are an 18-hole and a 9-hole golf course, a skating rink, a wave pool, picnic areas, playgrounds, tennis courts, and a wildlife preserve area.

The Allegheny County Fairgrounds are also located in the park; the fair is held in June every year.

Part of the park lies within South Park Township, renamed from Snowden Township in 1966, which is just north of the Washington County line about 12 miles south of Pittsburgh. The population is approximately 14,000. In addition to part of the park in the northwest portion, the township contains, the residential areas of Snowden and Broughton in the east, and the Library business district in the southwest. Library Road, Pennsylvania route 88, runs north-south through Library, Brownsville Road runs north-south through Snowden and Broughton, and Library and Brownsville Road runs east-west connecting the two.

PATransit's 42L light rail line terminates in Library; the park and ride lot where Library Road crosses the tracks is usually filled on weekdays by commuters riding to downtown Pittsburgh.

South Park Township is a quiet suburban bedroom community, consisting mainly of single-family homes, with only a few businesses located in Library, including a Pizza Hut, a couple of convenience stores, a couple of drugstores, a post office, and a state store. The nearest supermarkets and other major shopping areas are in Bethel Park.

The township library is on Brownsville Road, not actually in Library; this is because Library was named after a library that was founded there in 1833 to provide reading material for coal miners.

If you're one of those who never got into South Park I certainly don't envy you. Once you've gotten familiar with the crude humor the show is primarily known for you'll find layers of self-consciousness, critical eye on the world's affairs, and, most prominently to me, hilariously over-the-top character grotesques. If you want to see an idea taken to the extreme and at the same time strapped bare and exposed to all the allusions we connect with it, South Park is the way to go.

An often overlooked aspect of the series is, with the main characters being 3rd/4th graders, that many scenes and episodes deal with the kids' eye view on the world. It's not presented in a sentimental form though - it's usually delivered in a tongue-in-cheek manner that shows how kids actually act very rationally in their own way, and that our idealistic view on their behavior has the same source as their behavior - different interests and lack of information. Children know when they don't know, their parents are often not able to face it. Prominently, it also happens that the so-called grown-ups are way more ridiculously infantile than the kids they are supposed to take care of. You'll notice often - while their parents are going ape - the children, especially Kyle Broflowski and Stan Marsh (characters loosely based on the creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker - seem like the only individuals to remain reasonable throughout many episodes.

South Park regularly projects the message that the details behind most beliefs, mind sets, religions, mentalities, fears, myths, philosophies, pop culture phenomena, political ideas, nations, industries, scenes, even scientific methods, are, especially if compared conceptually to others, ridiculous and laughable when taken for granted and word by word. This cultural awareness that takes nothing as dead serious and at the same time tries to find an essential truth - and knowing when it is failing at that - in the most absurd scenarios - is what makes this show extremely liberating and astounding.

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