Sob (?), v. t. [See Sop.]

To soak.

[Obs.]

Mortimer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Sob, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sobbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sobbing.] [OE. sobben; akin to AS. seofian, siofian, to complain, bewail, seofung, siofung, sobbing, lamentation; cf. OHG. sfton, sftn, to sigh, MHG. siuften, siufzen, G. seufzen, MHG. sft a sigh, properly, a drawing in of breath, from sfen to drink, OHG. sfan. Cf. Sup.]

To sigh with a sudden heaving of the breast, or with a kind of convulsive motion; to sigh with tears, and with a convulsive drawing in of the breath.

Sobbing is the same thing [as sighing], stronger. Bacon.

She sighed, she sobbed, and, furious with despair. She rent her garments, and she tore her hair. Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.


Sob, n.

1.

The act of sobbing; a convulsive sigh, or inspiration of the breath, as in sorrow.

Break, heart, or choke with sobs my hated breath. Dryden.

2.

Any sorrowful cry or sound.

The tremulous sob of the complaining owl. Wordsworth.

 

© Webster 1913.

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