Snub (?), v. i. [Cf. D. snuiven to snort, to pant, G. schnauben, MHG. sn&umac;ben, Prov. G. schnupfen, to sob, and E. snuff, v.t.]

To sob with convulsions.

[Obs.]

Bailey.

 

© Webster 1913.


Snub, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Snubbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Snubbing.] [Cf. Icel. ssnubba to snub, chide, Sw. snubba, Icel. snubb&omac;ttr snubbed, nipped, and E. snib.]

1.

To clip or break off the end of; to check or stunt the growth of; to nop.

2.

To check, stop, or rebuke, with a tart, sarcastic reply or remark; to reprimand; to check.

J. Foster.

3.

To treat with contempt or neglect, as a forward or pretentious person; to slight designedly.

To snub a cablerope Naut., to check it suddenly in running out.

Totten.

 

© Webster 1913.


Snub, n.

1.

A knot; a protuberance; a song.

[Obs.]

[A club] with ragged snubs and knotty grain. Spenser.

2.

A check or rebuke; an intended slight.

J. Foster.

Snub nose, a short or flat nose. -- Snub post, ∨ Snubbing post Naut., a post on a dock or shore, around which a rope is thrown to check the motion of a vessel.

 

© Webster 1913.

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