Smearing is a technique used in rock climbing to help haul yourself up the cliff face. Essentially, one finds an incline or divot, or any slightly lessened angle of the face your attempting to conquer. Then you press the tips of your toes slightly above where you want you're foot to stick, press into and down on the rock, bending your toes back and smearing them against the unyielding stone. The only thing left to do then is utter a small prayer to the gods of friction and sticky rubber, and move on towards the next hold.

Smear (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Smeared (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Smearing.] [OE. smeren, smerien, AS. smierwan, smyrwan, fr. smeoru fat, grease; akin to D. smeren, OHG. smirwen, G. schmieren, Icel. smyrja to anoint. See Smear, n.]

1.

To overspread with anything unctuous, viscous, or adhesive; to daub; as, to smear anything with oil.

"Smear the sleepy grooms with blood."

Shak.

2.

To soil in any way; to contaminate; to pollute; to stain morally; as, to be smeared with infamy.

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Smear, n. [OE. smere,. smeoru fat, grease; akin to D. smeer, G. schmeer, OHG. smero, Icel. smjor, Sw. & Dan. smor butter, Goth. sma�xa1;rr fatness, smarna dung; cf. Lith. smarsas fat. Cf. Smirch.]

1.

A fat, oily substance; oinment.

Johnson.

2.

Hence, a spot made by, or as by, an unctuous or adhesive substance; a blot or blotch; a daub; a stain.

Slow broke the morn, All damp and rolling vapor, with no sun, But in its place a moving smear of light. Alexander Smith.

 

© Webster 1913.

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