Rove (?), v. t. [perhaps fr. or akin to reeve.]

1.

To draw through an eye or aperture.

2.

To draw out into falkes; to card, as wool.

Jamieson.

3.

To twist slightly; to bring together, as slivers of wool or cotton, and twist slightly before spinning.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rove (?), n.

1.

A copper washer upon which the end of a nail is clinched in boat building.

2.

A roll or sliver of wool or cotton drawn out and lighty twisted, preparatory to futher process; a roving.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rove, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Roved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Roving.] [Cf. D. rooven to rob; akin to E. reave. See Reave Rob.]

1.

To practice robbery on the seas;to wander about on the seas in piracy.

[Obs.]

Hakluyt.

2.

Hence, to wander; to ramble; to rauge; to go, move, or pass without certain direction in any manner, by sailing, walking, riding, flying, or otherwise.

For who has power to walk has power to rove. Arbuthnot.

3. Archery

To shoot at rovers; hence, to shoot at an angle of elevation, not at point-blank (rovers usually being beyond the point-blank range).

Fair Venusson that with thy cruel dart At that good knoght cunningly didst rove. Spenser.

Syn. -- To wander; roam; range; ramble stroll.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rove, v. t.

1.

To wander over or through.

Roving the field, i chanced A goodly tree far distant to behold. milton.

2.

To plow into ridges by turning the earth of two furrows together.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rove, n.

The act of wandering; a ramble.

In thy nocturnal rove one moment halt. Young.

Rove beetle Zool., any one of numerous species of beetles of the family Staphylinidae, having short elytra beneath which the wings are folded transversely. They are rapid runners, and seldom fly.

 

© Webster 1913.

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