rouse(rous) n.
pl:
rice(rïs)

1. A single spikelet, or "grain", from any of numerous species of the genus Oryza. (As in Oryza sativa, Oryza glaberrina, etc...)
The singular form of this word is seldom used due to the facts that:
    a)all known Oryza species produce rice in great quantities, and
    b)one rarely has occasion or necessity to isolate a rouse.
(This word-usage phenomenon is the inversion of the more familiar one with Spouse | Spice or louse | lice).

2. Proper name of the north-south road in Orlando, Florida which begins at approximately 28° 32min. 43sec.Lat. and -81° 13min. 22sec.Lon.

Rouse (rouz ∨ rous), v. i. & t. [Perhaps the same word as rouse to start up, "buckle to."] Naut.

To pull or haul strongly and all together, as upon a rope, without the assistance of mechanical appliances.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rouse (rouz), n. [Cf. D. roes drunkeness, icel. rss, Sw. rus, G. rauchen, and also E. rouse, v.t., rush, v.i. Cf. Row a disturbance.]

1.

A bumper in honor of a toast or health.

[Obs.]

Shak.

2.

A carousal; a festival; a drinking frolic.

Fill the cup, and fill the can, Have a rouse before the morn. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rouse, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Roused (rouzd); p. pr. & vb. n. Rousing.] [Probably of Scan. origin; cf. Sw. rusa to rush, Dan. ruse, AS. hreosan to fall, rush. Cf. Rush, v.]

1.

To cause to start from a covert or lurking place; as, to rouse a deer or other animal of the chase.

Like wild boars late roused out of the brakes. Spenser.

Rouse the fleet hart, and cheer the opening hound. Pope.

2.

To wake from sleep or repose; as, to rouse one early or suddenly.

3.

To excite to lively thought or action from a state of idleness, languor, stupidity, or indifference; as, to rouse the faculties, passions, or emotions.

To rouse up a people, the most phlegmatic of any in Christendom. Atterbury.

4.

To put in motion; to stir up; to agitate.

Blustering winds, which all night long Had roused the sea. Milton.

5.

To raise; to make erect.

[Obs.]

Spenser. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Rouse, v. i.

1.

To get or start up; to rise.

[Obs.]

Night's black agents to their preys do rouse. Shak.

2.

To awake from sleep or repose.

Morpheus rouses from his bed. Pope.

3.

To be exited to thought or action from a state of indolence or inattention.

 

© Webster 1913.

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