Re*volve" (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Revolved(?); p. pr. & vb. n. Revolving.] [L. revolvere, revolutum; pref. re- re- + volvere to roll, turn round. See Voluble, and cf. Revolt, revolution.]


To turn or roll round on, or as on, an axis, like a wheel; to rotate, -- which is the more specific word in this sense.

If the earth revolve thus, each house pear the equator must move a thousand miles an hour. I. Watts.


To move in a curved path round a center; as, the planets revolve round the sun.


To pass in cycles; as, the centuries revolve.


To return; to pass.




© Webster 1913.

Re*volve", v. t.


To cause to turn, as on an axis.

Then in the east her turn she shines, Revolved on heaven's great axile. Milton.


Hence, to turn over and over in the mind; to reflect repeatedly upon; to consider all aspects of.

This having heard, straight I again revolved The law and prophets. Milton.


© Webster 1913.

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