Re*volve" (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Revolved(?); p. pr. & vb. n. Revolving.] [L. revolvere, revolutum; pref. re- re- + volvere to roll, turn round. See Voluble, and cf. Revolt, revolution.]

1.

To turn or roll round on, or as on, an axis, like a wheel; to rotate, -- which is the more specific word in this sense.

If the earth revolve thus, each house pear the equator must move a thousand miles an hour. I. Watts.

2.

To move in a curved path round a center; as, the planets revolve round the sun.

3.

To pass in cycles; as, the centuries revolve.

4.

To return; to pass.

[R.]

Ayliffe.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*volve", v. t.

1.

To cause to turn, as on an axis.

Then in the east her turn she shines, Revolved on heaven's great axile. Milton.

2.

Hence, to turn over and over in the mind; to reflect repeatedly upon; to consider all aspects of.

This having heard, straight I again revolved The law and prophets. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

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