Revocation, in law, the destroying or annulling of a deed or will which had existence until the act of revocation made it void. The revocation of a deed can only be effected when an express stipulation has been made in the deed itself reserving this power. The revocation of a will can be made in four different ways: (1) by another will; (2) by intentional burning, or the like; (3) by the disposition of the property by the testator in his lifetime; (4) by marriage.


Entry from Everybody's Cyclopedia, 1912.

Rev`o*ca"tion (?), n. [L. revocatio: cf. F. r'evocation.]

1.

The act of calling back, or the state of being recalled; recall.

One that saw the people bent for the revocation of Calvin, gave him notice of their affection. Hooker.

2.

The act by which one, having the right, annuls an act done, a power or authority given, or a license, gift, or benefit conferred; repeal; reversal; as, the revocation of an edict, a power, a will, or a license.

 

© Webster 1913.

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