Re*ver"ber*ate (?), a. [L. reverberatus, p. p. of reverberare to strike back, repel; pref. re- re- + verberare to lash, whip, beat, fr. verber a lash, whip, rod.]

1.

Reverberant.

[Obs.] "The reverberate hills."

Shak.

2.

Driven back, as sound; reflected.

[Obs.]

Drayton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*ver"ber*ate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reverberated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Reverberating.]

1.

To return or send back; to repel or drive back; to echo, as sound; to reflect, as light, as light or heat.

Who, like an arch, reverberates The voice again. Shak.

2.

To send or force back; to repel from side to side; as, flame is reverberated in a furnace.

3.

Hence, to fuse by reverberated heat.

[Obs.] "Reverberated into glass."

Sir T. Browne.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*ver"ber*ate, v. i.

1.

To resound; to echo.

2.

To be driven back; to be reflected or repelled, as rays of light; to be echoed, as sound.

 

© Webster 1913.

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