This is what 3D animators and modelers do after they finish a scene. This is the act of the computer converting a 3D scene with 3D models and polygons into a 2D raster image. It takes up all of your processor power and it's a bitch not being able to&use your friggin computer while you're rendering (which, btw, could take hours, days, or weeks, depending on how big and complex the 3D scene is and how crappy your computer is.)

Rendering also applies to 2D graphics and compositing artists. Essentially, if you have to create anything visual within the computer, you have to render it. Whatever you create within the program of your choice (from Lightwave to After Effects), if you want to turn it from a set of computer parameters to an actual image or series of images, you must render it.

With modern computers, you do not have to stop everything to render a shot or image. I am well known among my friends for posting to E2, posting to my blog, writing, Photoshopping, and many other things while rendering relatively complex effects shots in Adobe After Effects, Discreet Combustion, as well as other motion graphics applications. Your computer may slow down, as mine does, but such multitasking is possible and, in my view, totally encouraged.

I would have encouraged nEoN nOoDlE to update his or her own WU on this subject, in lieu of my contribution, but it appears that he or she has not been on E2 for quite some time. I'm working on a revision of this WU that will cover the information from his/her WU.

Rend"er (-?r), n. [From Rend.]

One who rends.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ren"der (r?n"d?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Rendered (-d?rd);p. pr. & vb. n. Rendering.] [F. rendre, LL. rendre, fr. L. reddere; pref. red-, re-, re- + dare to give. See Datetime, and cf. Reddition, Rent.]

1.

To return; to pay back; to restore.

Whose smallest minute lost, no riches render may. Spenser.

2.

To inflict, as a retribution; to requite.

I will render vengeance to mine enemies. Deut. xxxii. 41.

3.

To give up; to yield; to surrender.

I 'll make her render up her page to me. Shak.

4.

Hence, to furnish; to contribute.

Logic renders its daily service to wisdom and virtue. I. Watts.

5.

To furnish; to state; to deliver; as, to render an account; to render judgment.

6.

To cause to be, or to become; as, to render a person more safe or more unsafe; to render a fortress secure.

7.

To translate from one language into another; as, to render Latin into English.

8.

To interpret; to set forth, represent, or exhibit; as, an actor renders his part poorly; a singer renders a passage of music with great effect; a painter renders a scene in a felicitous manner.

He did render him the most unnatural That lived amongst men. Shak.

9.

To try out or extract (oil, lard, tallow, etc.) from fatty animal substances; as, to render tallow.

10.

To plaster, as a wall of masonry, without the use of lath.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ren"der, v. i.

1.

To give an account; to make explanation or confession.

[Obs.]

2. Naut.

To pass; to run; -- said of the passage of a rope through a block, eyelet, etc.; as, a rope renders well, that is, passes freely; also, to yield or give way.

Totten.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ren"der, n.

1.

A surrender.

[Obs.]

Shak.

2.

A return; a payment of rent.

In those early times the king's household was supported by specific renders of corn and other victuals from the tenants of the demains. Blackstone.

3.

An account given; a statement.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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