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3:1 Lord, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me.
3:2 Many there be which say of my soul, There is no help for him in God.
Selah.
3:3 But thou, O LORD, art a shield for me; my glory, and the lifter up of mine head.
3:4 I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah.
3:5 I laid me down and slept; I awaked; for the LORD sustained me.
3:6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about.
3:7 Arise, O LORD; save me, O my God: for thou hast smitten all mine enemies upon the cheek bone; thou hast broken the teeth of the ungodly.
3:8 Salvation belongeth unto the LORD: thy blessing is upon thy people.
Selah.



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From the Great Bible, 1540 edition (known as Cranmer's Bible). Set in the Book of Common Prayer, 1662, for Morning Prayer on the 1st day of the month.

PSALM 3. Domine, quid multiplicati?
  1. Lord, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise against me.
  2. Many one there be that say of my soul, There is no help for him in his God.
  3. But thou, O Lord, art my defender; thou art my worship, and the lifter up of my head.
  4. I did call upon the Lord with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill.
  5. I laid me down and slept, and rose up again; for the Lord sustained me.
  6. I will not be afraid for ten thousands of the people, that have set themselves against me round about.
  7. Up, Lord, and help me, O my God, for thou smitest all mine enemies upon the cheek-bone; thou hast broken the teeth of the ungodly.
  8. Salvation belongeth unto the Lord; and thy blessing is upon thy people.



From the Vulgate:

  1. Domine quare multiplicati sunt hostes mei multi consurgunt adversus me
  2. Multi dicunt animae meae non est salus huic in Deo semper
  3. Tu autem Domine clipeus circa me gloria mea et exaltans caput meum
  4. voce mea ad Dominum clamabo et exaudiet me de monte sancto suo semper
  5. Ego dormivi et soporatus sum evigilavi quia Dominus sustentavit me
  6. Non timebo milia populi quae circumdederunt me surge Domine salvum me fac Deus meus
  7. Quia percussisti omnium inimicorum meorum maxillam dentes impiorum confregisti
  8. Domini est salus super populum tuum benedictio tua semper



The psalm in either case may be followed by the Gloria Patri.



Notes: This psalm is said to have been written by David when he was pursued by Absalom. Verse 3 has the first use of the expression 'my soul', which occurs about 130 times in the book and means approximately 'my whole being'.
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible
back to: Psalms
Book: Psalms
Chapter: 3

Overview:
David complains to God of his enemies, and confides in God.
(1-3) He triumphs over his fears, and gives God the Glory, and
takes to himself the comfort. (4-8)

1-3 An active believer, the more he is beaten off from God,
either By the rebukes of Providence, or the reproaches of
enemies, the faster Hold he will take, and the closer will he
cleave to him. A Child of God startles at the very thought of
despairing of help in God. See what God is to his people, what
he will be, what they have found him, what David found in him.
1. Safety; a Shield for me; which denotes the advantage of that
protection. 2. Honour; those whom God owns for his, have true
honour Put upon them. 3. Joy and deliverance. If, in the worst
of times, God's people can lift up their heads with joy, knowing
that all shall work for good to them, they will own God as
giving them both cause and hearts to rejoice.

4-8 Care and grief do us good, when they engage us to pray to
God, as in Earnest. David had always found God ready to answer
his prayers. Nothing can fix a gulf between the communications
of God's Grace towards us, and the working of his Grace in us;
between his favour and our Faith. He had always been very safe
under the Divine protection. This is applicable to the common
mercies of every night, for which we ought to give thanks every
morning. Many Lie down, and cannot sleep, through pain of body,
or anguish of mind, or the continual alarms of fear in the
night. But it seems here rather to be meant of the calmness of
David's Spirit, in the midst of his dangers. The Lord, By his
Grace and the consolations of his Spirit, made him easy. It is a
great Mercy, when we are in trouble, to have our minds stayed
upon God. Behold the Son of David composing himself to his Rest
upon the Cross, that Bed of sorrows; commending his Spirit into
the Father's hands in full confidence of a joyful resurrection.
Behold this, O Christian: let Faith teach thee how to sleep, and
how to die; while it assures thee that as sleep is a short
Death, So Death is only a longer sleep; the same God Watches
over thee, in thy Bed and in thy Grave. David's Faith became
triumphant. He began the psalm with complaints of the strength
and malice of his enemies; but concludes with rejoicing in the
power and Grace of his God, and now sees more with him than
against him. Salvation belongeth unto the Lord; he has power to
save, be the danger ever So great. All that have the Lord for
their God, are sure of Salvation; for he who is their God, is
the God of Salvation.

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