Prow (?), n. [F. proue (cf. Sp. & Pg. proa, It. prua), L. prora, Gr. , akin to before. See Pro-, and cf. Prore.]

The fore part of a vessel; the bow; the stem; hence, the vessel itself.

Wordsworth.

The floating vessel swum Uplifted, and secure with beaked prow rode tilting o'er the waves. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prow (?), n.

See Proa.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prow, a. [Compar. Prower (?); superl. Prowest.] [OF.prou, preu, F. preux, fr. L. pro, prod, in prodesse to be useful. See Pro-, and cf. Prude.]

Valiant; brave; gallant; courageous.

[Archaic]

Tennyson.

The prowest knight that ever field did fight. Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prow, n. [OE. & OF. prou. See Prow, a.]

Benefit; profit; good; advantage.

[Obs.]

That shall be for your hele and for your prow. Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.

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