Pros"trate (?), a. [L. prostratus, p. p. of prosternere to prostrate; pro before, forward + sternere to spread out, throw down. See Stratum.]

1.

Lying at length, or with the body extended on the ground or other surface; stretched out; as, to sleep prostrate

Elyot.

Groveling and prostrate on yon lake of fire.
Milton.

2.

Lying at mercy, as a supplicant.

Dryden.

3.

Lying in a humble, lowly, or suppliant posture.

Prostrate fall
Before him reverent, and there confess
Humbly our faults.
Milton.

4. Bot.

Trailing on the ground; procumbent.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pros"trate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Prostrated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Prostrating.]

1.

To lay flat; to throw down; to level; to fell; as, to prostrate the body; to prostrate trees or plants.

Evelyn.

2.

to overthrow; to demolish; to destroy; to deprive of efficiency; to ruin; as, to prostrate a village; to prostrate a government; to prostrate law or justice.

3.

To throw down, or cause to fall in humility or adoration; to cause to bow in humble reverence; used reflexively; as, he prostrated himself.

Milman.

4.

To cause to sink totally; to deprive of strength; to reduce; as, a person prostrated by fever.

 

© Webster 1913.

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