Pro*pose" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Proposed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Proposing.] [F. proposer; pref. pro- (L. pro for, forward) + poser to place. See Pose, v.]

1.

To set forth.

[Obs.]

That being proposed brimfull of wine, one scarce could lift it up. Chapman.

2.

To offer for consideration, discussion, acceptance, or adoption; as, to propose terms of peace; to propose a question for discussion; to propose an alliance; to propose a person for office.

3.

To set before one's self or others as a purpose formed; hence, to purpose; to intend.

I propose to relate, in several volumes, the history of the people of New England.

Palfrey.

To propose to one's self, to intend; to design.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pro*pose", v. i.

1.

To speak; to converse.

[Obs.]

There shalt thou find my cousin Beatrice, Proposing with the prince and Claudio. Shak.

2.

To form or declare a purpose or intention; to lay a scheme; to design; as, man proposes, but God disposes.

3.

To offer one's self in marriage.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pro*pose", n. [F. propos, L. propositum. See Propound, Purpose, n.]

Talk; discourse.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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