A sauce used widely in Chinese food, especially with wrap-style dishes such as Peking Duck and certain dim sum, as well as Chinese roasts such as roast pork, duck and goose. It is very sweet and has a smooth texture, not unlike Oyster Sauce. It is a very rich sauce, so don't use too much of it at once. Sometimes mixed with a sour sauce to balance its sweetness. I especially like it with Green Onion Pancakes.

Ingredients (makes about 1 1/4 cups)

Cooking
  1. Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, then simmer a few minutes to blend flavors.
  2. Let it cool, then chill. Tastes best if refrigerated, covered, overnight to allow seasonings to mellow. Serve chilled.

This sweet and sour topping consists roughly of plums, apricots, sugar and seasoning. This thick condiment is traditionally served with Peking Duck but may also be provided with duck, pork, or spareribs. Duck sauce is generally acquired from grocery stores or you're also presented with a few individual servings when you get Chinese takeout. But say you want more than what you can dig up at the store or from the Chinese restaurant…well with this uncomplicated recipe direct from my own vaults, you can easily make all you want and even spice it up a bit if you'd like: Yield: 2 pints

Ingredients

  • 1 pound plums halved and pitted
  • 1 pound apricots halved and pitted
  • 1/4 cups cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup chopped ginger
  • 1 small onion sliced
  • 1 (or more) Serrano Chile seeded and chopped
  • 2 small garlic cloves sliced
  • 4 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seed toasted
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Instructions: Combine first four ingredients and cook over moderate heat for five minutes. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for fifteen minutes. In a separate pan, combine next four ingredients and boil for ten minutes. Combine the first two mixtures with the remaining ingredients and simmer for forty-five minutes. Remove cinnamon. Puree in food processor. Return to pot and simmer until thick. Transfer to sterilized canning jar, loosen cap, and let cool. Tighten caps and let stand in dark at least 2 weeks. Letting the jars stand two weeks allows the sauce to somewhat ferment, to give it that bitter/sour taste.

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