In hydrology, piping is seepage-induced erosion where the flow of water in a sublayer of earth is so rapid that it begins to move individual soil grains. Grains are first removed at an exit point, where the water leaves the soil and enters open air or water and works its way upstream, creating pipe-like channels underground.

Pip"ing (?), a. [From Pipe, v.]

1.

Playing on a musical pipe.

"Lowing herds and piping swains."

Swift.

2.

Peaceful; favorable to, or characterized by, the music of the pipe rather than of the drum and fife.

Shak.

3.

Emitting a high, shrill sound.

4.

Simmering; boiling; sizzling; hissing; -- from the sound of boiling fluids.

Piping crow, Piping crow shrike, Piping roller Zool., any Australian bird of the genus Gymnorhina, esp. G. tibicen, which is black and white, and the size of a small crow. Called also caruck. -- Piping frog Zool., a small American tree frog (Hyla Pickeringii) which utters a high, shrill note in early spring. -- Piping hot, boiling hot; hissing hot; very hot. [Colloq.]

Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pip"ing, n.

1.

A small cord covered with cloth, -- used as trimming for women's dresses.

2.

Pipes, collectively; as, the piping of a house.

3.

The act of playing on a pipe; the shrill noted of birds, etc.

4.

A piece cut off to be set or planted; a cutting; also, propagation by cuttings.

 

© Webster 1913.

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