Peal (?), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] Zool.

A small salmon; a grilse; a sewin.

[Prov. Eng.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Peal, v. i.

To appeal.

[Obs.]

Spencer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Peal, n. [An abbrev. of F. appel a call, appeal, ruffle of a drum, fr. appeller to call, L. appellare. See Appeal.]

1.

A loud sound, or a succession of loud sounds, as of bells, thunder, cannon, shouts, of a multitude, etc.

"A fair peal of artillery."

Hayward.

Whether those peals of praise be his or no. Shak.

And a deep thunder, peal on peal, afar. Byron.

2.

A set of bells tuned to each other according to the diatonic scale; also, the changes rung on a set of bells.

To ring a peal. See under Ring.

 

© Webster 1913.


Peal, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Pealed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Pealing.]

1.

To utter or give out loud sounds.

There let the pealing organ blow. Milton.

2.

To resound; to echo.

And the whole air pealed With the cheers of our men. Longfellow.

 

© Webster 1913.


Peal, v. t.

1.

To utter or give forth loudly; to cause to give out loud sounds; to noise abroad.

The warrior's name, Though pealed and chimed on all the tongues of fame. J. Barlow.

2.

To assail with noise or loud sounds.

Nor was his ear less pealed. Milton.

3.

To pour out.

[Prov. Eng.]

Halliwell.

 

© Webster 1913.

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